Author Topic: Paper on Hurricane Sandy response and what should be done differently  (Read 1291 times)

Offline Chemsoldier

  • Pot Stirrer
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5722
  • Karma: 544
An interesting paper on Sandy, what worked and what didn't and where preparations for future shocks should go.  While I can feel a little partisan hobby horse riding in it, it still makes a ton of good points.

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2013/10/after-hurricane-sandy-time-to-learn-and-implement-the-lessons

Online FreeLancer

  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5990
  • Karma: 771
Re: Paper on Hurricane Sandy response and what should be done differently
« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2016, 03:50:29 PM »
Interesting.

Offline Alan Georges

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4589
  • Karma: 210
  • Still trying to reason with hurricane season.
Re: Paper on Hurricane Sandy response and what should be done differently
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2016, 06:45:57 PM »
Yes, interesting stuff.  In particular the bullet-pointed abstract is worth reading, definitely not a TLDR.  Thanks Chem.

One thing that's usually worthwhile in these reports is to search on "individual" to see what the authors are recommending at that level.  Face it, it's usually all that we individuals are in control of anyway.  Some nuggets popped right out.

Also of particular interest is the paragraph:
Quote
Change the current American mindset of disaster response and relief from overfederalization to civil society. President Obama said it well: “But no matter how much money we invest or how sensibly we design our policies, the change that Americans are looking for will not come from government alone. There is a force for good greater than government. It is an expression of faith, this yearning to give back, this hungering for a purpose larger than our own, that reveals itself not simply in places of worship, but in senior centers and shelters, schools and hospitals, and any place an American decides.”[35] This includes in the aftermath of a disaster. Unfortunately, politicians often feel that they and the federal government must be seen in control after a disaster, even if government control is ultimately detrimental to true relief. Instead of merely paying lip service to the importance of civil society, U.S. leaders should realize that in both short-term and long-term disaster relief efforts, civil society organizations are powerful assets, and that a government-centric approach fails to use these assets to their fullest.
Good to see some recognition across many levels that not the FedGov is not the font of all salvation.