Author Topic: Potassium Iodide  (Read 17344 times)

Offline archer

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Potassium Iodide
« on: October 21, 2008, 01:19:26 PM »
Anyone bought some Potassium Iodide pills in case of a 'nuclear event'? What are your thoughts about a nuclear threat?

NukePills has decent prices on theirs, and even offer 1 free set if you buy 9. (http://www.nukepills.com/potassium-iodide.htm)

tash

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2008, 01:58:54 PM »
I don't think it would be a bad thing to add to round out an emergency kit. Unfortunately, for me and my own, I don't have a BOL yet and I live next to a army base that is on 'the list'.  Basically, if I can't bug out ahead of time, I'm screwed. I may order some as they seem relatively cheap and seem like good insurance if we can bug out.

-Tash

Offline ColdHaven

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2008, 02:39:16 PM »
I bought potassium iodide several years ago.  I keep a bottle at home, as well as in the First Aid kits of my cars (you never know where you will be when a disaster hits).  I'd better check on the shelf life of them.

I assume that one day, the US will get hit by a dirty bomb if not by a nuke itself.

The technology is out there, and is spreading more and more to rogue countries.  There is no way to prevent the flow of information, so some day, it will get in the hands of the bad guys.

Of course, there is always the possibility of a nuclear accident itself if you live near a nuke plant.

As I recall, the bottles were about $10 each.  Seems like cheap insurance against thyroid cancer.

The bad guys already have it. I am not sure if you have heard about Korea and the negotiations the UN have done with them to disarm and not develop the nuclear facilities or missiles. A few years back Korea tested one of their nuclear weapons by launching it over Japan. They were not very happy with that. At this point they have given the middle finger to the UN and said that they are going to develop the weapons and nuclear plants anyway. I am not in an area that is high risk. The closest military facility is Fort Bragg. If that gets toasted we would have to deal with fallout, but the way the wind currents move here, that is not much of a worry. I have preps in this area, just in case, but not a whole lot. I think I am at more of a risk for nuclear than chemical. Biological on the otherhand...it depends on the weapon type. Heck, it could be a pandemic and spread. I have preps for that too, but not a whole lot. I gear my preps more towards what I think is a bigger risk.

Offline ElyasWolff

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2008, 08:23:59 PM »
I would like to have some just because. But they only protect one part of your body by hyper saturating it with non radioactive iodine.

Make sure you have good masks and somewhere to hole up for two weeks. It is the radioactive dust that kills, either breathed in, drank, or eaten.

There is an old book "Nuclear war Survival Skills" it can be found online for free. Worth your time if you are worried about this.

Offline 19kilo

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2008, 09:55:24 PM »
While a nuclear detonation is not on the top of my priority list, I do have  the potassium, iodide pills.  Just in case.

My big fear is the BC of a NBC attack.  I only have one pro mask now, will work on getting a few more for the family in the future.

Offline 19kilo

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2008, 10:17:40 PM »
I can only imagine the pucker factor in running from those clouds. :o

I think the KI is something that I feel like I need to have.  The survivalist in me I guess.

Offline javaguy

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2008, 05:58:33 AM »
Yes, I picked up 3 bottles of Potassium Iodate some years back.  There is a difference between IODATE and IODINE.  According to the paperwork I received, Iodate has fewer side effects and is less bitter tasting.. tho since these are pills it wouldn't matter I suppose.  You need to know the dosage.  Without this stuff, radiation gets absorbed by the body pretty fast..
http://www.campingsurvival.com/nucprot.html

Offline archer

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2008, 12:12:50 PM »
Nothing personal JohnnyPaid, but I notice you have made 3 posts and all 3 are about nukepills.com.  Do you work for them by any chance?

I'm not commenting on them (or you) pro or con, but it is starting to sound like a commercial
I was wondering that also...

Offline Conductor71

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2009, 07:13:51 AM »
Hi All,

I'm checking around for these pills at the moment and ran into this interesting explanation of how safe/effective potassium iodate (or iodide) is, according to the FDA.  I thought getting it would basically cover you from getting cancer from the radiation afterwards but it sounds like it only helps with the thyroid gland.  Also, according to the FDA (and in response to the poster who mentions dirty bombs) it sounds like it doesn't actually help in those instances because of the type of radiation.  Here's the article...

http://www.campingsurvival.com/nohearesocof.html

I know this is an old post but when someone's looking for it in the future, I wanted to help keep the potassium iodide info in one place.   

I'm also looking for info on how you dose someone who takes thyroid medicine as someone near and dear in my family does. 

Thanks for all the great posts everyone and keep prepping!


HumeMan

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2009, 06:52:28 AM »
Great post.

That link makes me wonder if we should even bother with the pills.   :(

Offline Mark

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2010, 11:24:32 PM »
It is my understanding that the thyroid saturates at 30 mg whereas in table salt we only get micrograms. We may be best to rotate our stock by using it at perhaps 1/2 a pill per month or so. 

                                                           Mark

Offline dodgetruckmom

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2010, 06:09:55 AM »
Quote
I'm also looking for info on how you dose someone who takes thyroid medicine as someone near and dear in my family does. 

Do they take a replacement dose of thyroid meds, or a supplemental dose? I have ZERO thyroid function anymore, so I take thyroid hormone to replace what my body would make normally. Some people still have a functioning thyroid (albeit functioning at suboptimal levels), and may take enough hormone to give their thyroid a boost. And if they have Hashimoto's Thyroiditis (an autoimmune disease), iodine may be contraindicated. I've already had leukemia, so in a nuclear accident, I think that my thyroid would be the least of my worries.  :-\

I don't have an answer for you beyond the fact that thyroid disease (hypo- and hyper-) is incredibly misdiagnosed and mistreated in this country, and it's hard to find good information.

Offline Maria

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2010, 06:45:39 AM »
I live close to a nuclear generating facility, a station that was designed the same as Three Mile Island station. I moved further away to remove myself from the threat. The county passes out iodide pills, but I don't consider them worth the effort, for several reasons:

The station is always leaking radiation, but it's rarely reported. We know this because interested individuals have gone by the facility with Geiger counters, and the results were not to their liking.  :-\ The last thing a station will do is report that they're having a leakage, so bet on this: you've already been exposed. And the continual exposure is probably a bigger threat than a large scale nuclear meltdown.

Iodide protects the thyroid against a specific type of isotope. So if you were counting on iodide to help you with those severe radiation burns that are going to seep up through your internal organs and to the surface of your skin due to severe exposure, drink yourself some milk and kiss your ass goodbye.

You read the accounts of the survivors of Chernobyl in Voices from Chernobyl available here: http://www.borders.com.au/book/voices-from-chernobyl-the-oral-history-of-a-nuclear-disaster/208296/

Warning: the book is not for the faint of heart. I cannot think of a narrative history more heartbreaking than what happened to these citizens, and most of it was swept under the rug by the Soviet regime. But if you want an eyewitness account of what you can expect if your nuclear system fails and melts down, this is it, and we have very few first hand accounts on record of what actually does happen. I would consider this an invaluable resource for any prepper who wants to know what to expect if their nuclear generating facility melts down. In this case and Three Mile Island as well, the public is usually the last to be informed of what is going on, in part because of the large amount of of government chain of commands and protocols that must be followed.

I'd spend my money on a scanner before I'd spend it on iodide pills.

HumeMan

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2010, 05:34:50 PM »
I would just like to update this thread (and my previous post).

For the definitive source about the benefits of Potassium Iodide and nuclear safety in general, I stongly suggest that everyone visit http://www.ki4u.com/#77.

After much reading from various sources, Potassium Iodide pills absolutely do make a difference in survival rates.

HumeMan

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2010, 05:50:36 PM »
I've bought several packages from Emergency Essentials.

Yes, it is more expensive buying them in the foil packs than the bottle, but for me, it is easier to disperse them around the house, car and bug out bags.


[img width= height=]http://img63.imageshack.us/img63/8439/pillsr.jpg[/img]

Offline Imperial Goat

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #15 on: October 13, 2010, 01:22:51 PM »
I've not yet bought KI pills, but they are on my list, along with a NukAlert.  Not so much for nuclear attack, but the city where I work has a nuke power plant on one end, a nuclear accelerator lab in the middle, and a shipyard with nuclear aircraft carriers at the far end. :o

Offline Mark

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #16 on: October 26, 2010, 12:46:37 PM »
As I was trying to state earlier , these pills are not only in case of emergency but as a supplement . See the following :

                                                 https://www.drbrownstein.com/homePage.php

Offline grisrob

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #17 on: October 26, 2010, 09:36:29 PM »

Offline Sid

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #18 on: October 27, 2010, 07:56:46 AM »
Most of us are probably deficient in iodine to begin with.

Here is an interesting video of a doctor discussing the issue:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EoMfg76gAUo#

And here is a write up by another doctor addressing the same issues.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/miller/miller20.html

My view is that if you already have your body loaded up with iodine as part of your everyday life, then if there is a nuclear accident or nuclear attack you are already prepared, plus you don't need to worry about shelf life if you are constantly adding more as part of your diet to replace what is used up.  I doubt that if there were an accident or attack, that you could even get potassium iodide since there would be a mad dash of people in panic to gobble what little supply there is.   There are other benefits to taking iodine in addition to the radiation issue.

I personally take something called Iodoral which is a combination of potassium iodide and elemental iodine.  While the RDA for iodine is measured in micrograms, there are a number of doctors with articles on the internet who recommend doses in milligrams. 

If I start to glow in the dark, I'll let you know.

Offline ColdHaven

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #19 on: October 27, 2010, 08:50:46 PM »
I thought potassium iodide was different than straight iodine. If that were they are the same thing then taking a daily multi vitamin would take care of the issue. I believe that iodide specifically fills the thyroid gland itself and targets it for absorpotion. I could be wrong since I am not sure on that. +1 for the informative vid. I suggest most people to take a multi vitamin anyway. You just don't get the nutrition you need from your diet any more.

Offline Sid

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #20 on: October 27, 2010, 11:56:03 PM »
I thought potassium iodide was different than straight iodine. If that were they are the same thing then taking a daily multi vitamin would take care of the issue. I believe that iodide specifically fills the thyroid gland itself and targets it for absorpotion. I could be wrong since I am not sure on that. +1 for the informative vid. I suggest most people to take a multi vitamin anyway. You just don't get the nutrition you need from your diet any more.

Iodine, the element  has only 7 electrons in its outer electron orbit which gives it a high electronegativity.  This means that it is highly likely to react with other elements with lower electronegativity like potassium.  When iodine is combined with potassium the compound is potassium iodide, but the atom of iodine in that compound is identical to a free atom of iodine.  The thyroid gland takes up iodine to make thyroid hormones which are essentially tyrosine and iodine, so the thyroid can use either potassium iodide or iodine to make these hormones; it just breaks down the potassium iodide into potassium and iodine first if that is what you give it.  If the thyroid gland is saturated with iodine then it will not take up more, which is why iodine is recommended to prevent the uptake of a release of radioactive iodine.  The reason that potassium iodide is recommended instead of elemental iodine is that it is easier to store and less like to react with something else since the iodine in it has already reacted with the potassium and that compound is fairly stable.  Elemental iodine is always trying to react with something which creates storage problems.

The iodine which you buy in drugstores to use as an antibacterial is not for internal use since it contains wood alcohol.  But there is something called Lugol's solution which is a mix of potassium iodide, iodine, and distilled water that can be taken internally or used externally; it usually has 6.25 milligrams  per drop if it is 5% solution.  There are pills that can be purchased under different brand names that are similar to Lugol's and of course there are potassium iodide pills that have been talked about in prior posts.

You mention the iodine in a multi-vitamin.  I am looking at my multi-vitamin and it has 225 micrograms of iodine as potassium iodide.  I am also looking at a bottle of potassium iodide pills with each pill containing 32.5 milligrams or potassium iodide, equal to about 24.375 milligrams of iodine and 8.125 milligrams of potassium.  The Iodoral I earlier mentioned has 12.5 milligrams of iodine, 5 as iodine, and 7.5 as potassium iodide.  So you can see that a multi-vitamin contains a very, very low amount of iodine by comparison.  I have read articles that indicate that our bodies, should contain about 1,500 milligrams of iodine, and that we might use about 6 milligrams a day, so if you were very deficient the 225 micrograms in a multi-vitamin would not do you much good, especially considering that we probably only absorb half of what we consume.

 

   

 

Offline ColdHaven

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #21 on: October 28, 2010, 04:31:28 AM »
+1 again for awesome information. I understand now. Thanks for the clarification. So its kind of like Vitamin D. They used to think the amount that was in multi vitamins was enough, but now they are finding out that 2,000 - 5,000 units per day might be best for the body. So iodine does not have a culmalative effect? Meaning that your body absorbs it slower than the daily intake of iodine?

HumeMan

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #22 on: October 28, 2010, 06:17:29 PM »
Taking enough Potassium Iodide daily, to make it effective against Iodide Radiation, would be both impractical and deadly.

The purpose of the Potassium Iodide pills, is to fill your thyroid completely, not allowing room for the radiation to collect. 

It would be VERY unsafe to take a daily dosage even approaching the levels needed to block the radiation.

These pills are incase of emergency only.  Designed to only be used for a limited period of time. 

NOT as a daily "maintenance" drug.

Offline Sid

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #23 on: October 28, 2010, 11:06:42 PM »
+1 again for awesome information. I understand now. Thanks for the clarification. So its kind of like Vitamin D. They used to think the amount that was in multi vitamins was enough, but now they are finding out that 2,000 - 5,000 units per day might be best for the body. So iodine does not have a culmalative effect? Meaning that your body absorbs it slower than the daily intake of iodine?

In addition to the needs of the thyroid, every cell needs iodine.  Whatever you consume, you only absorb about half, the remainder just goes through your digestive tract without being absorbed.  The half you do absorb gets used in various functions, and some of that then gets excreted in your sweat, urine, and poop.  Estimates are that you need 6 to 12 mg per day instead of the RDA of 150mcg to maintain your current store, but if you are deficient to begin with, you need more to build up your reserves. So if you take in more than you excrete, yes it does have a cumulative effect until your body is saturated, at which point you only need a maintenance dose.  Some people claim to have taken 100 mg daily over several years without any noticeable adverse effect, but like with anything there is a level where you can cause harm; people can even die from drinking excessive amounts of water, so it is important to use good judgment.

Offline Sid

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #24 on: October 29, 2010, 12:37:53 AM »
Taking enough Potassium Iodide daily, to make it effective against Iodide Radiation, would be both impractical and deadly.

The purpose of the Potassium Iodide pills, is to fill your thyroid completely, not allowing room for the radiation to collect. 

It would be VERY unsafe to take a daily dosage even approaching the levels needed to block the radiation.

These pills are incase of emergency only.  Designed to only be used for a limited period of time. 

NOT as a daily "maintenance" drug.

I do not agree with your statement.  First of all, iodine is not a drug, it is a mineral that if we did not get any would cause death.  It is an essential nutrient.  Your body does not manufacture it out of something else, so you must regularly consume a certain amount either in food or as a supplement.  Is there enough in our food to provide that amount, or is it necessary to take supplements? What is the optimum amount?

First let me point out some chemistry.  Fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, and astatine (from smallest to largest) are the elements in group 17 (the halogen group) of the periodic table. Astatine is very rare and not important to this discussion.  These elements have one thing in common, and that is their outer electron shells have only 7 electrons.  This makes them electron deficient so they readily react with other elements that have neutral or excess electrons.  Notice that these elements are all toxic in varying degrees.  They are used to kill life.  Chlorine and bromine are added to swimming pools to kill bacteria.  Chlorine gas was used in WWI to kill the enemy. People use iodine on cuts to kill bacteria.  Fluorine, chlorine and bromine are components in insecticides.  Bromine is sprayed on fruits and vegetables after harvest to kill organisms that would cause spoilage.  They are killers because they readily react with other elements.  The smaller the more toxic because of something called electronegativity.  Electronegativity is calculated with a formula that takes into account the mass of an atom and the distance from the center of the atom to the outer electron shell.  Think of each atom being like a magnet, and the higher the electronegativity, the stronger the magnet, so fluorine bonds to other elements more tightly than chlorine, and chlorine more tightly than bromine, and bromine more tightly than iodine. 

So why would we want to consume any of theses highly reactive elements?  There is no known need in our bodies for fluorine and bromine; there is no RDA for either of these.  But we would die without chlorine and iodine.  Our bodies are designed to use these two elements.  We need chlorine to make hydrochloric acid to digest food.  Our white blood cells use chlorine in the form of hypochlorite to kill germs that invade us.  We need iodine for our thyroid glands to make thyroid hormones, which regulates many functions in our bodies including metabolism and apotosis (programmed cell death); thyroid hormones are also precursors to other hormones.  We store a significant amount of iodine in our skin, which is related to protection from infection.  Iodine is antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal.

Much of the iodine in the world is in seawater, hence in seafood.  Some of it gets deposited on land near seacoasts, but the further away from an ocean, the less there is replenished from the rainwater cycle.  And modern farming techniques do not include adding iodine to the soil.  So our soil is getting more and more depleted, so plants cannot absorb what is not there.  Years ago to solve the obvious diseases of iodine deficiency, goiter and cretinism, small quantities of iodine were added to salt, but only about half of the population uses iodized salt. At one time iodine was added to bread as a dough conditioner and added to milk to prevent spoilage, but this is no longer the case.  So we are getting less and less iodine in our food.

And here is the rub.  Smaller halogens, fluorine, chlorine and bromine displace iodine in our cells.  This is because they can better stick to the chemical receptor sites in cells that would normally be where iodine attached.  Iodine is the least reactive of the halogens so it gets bullied by the other halogens.  This would not be a problem if we lived in a less toxic world, because we would be getting very little fluorine or bromine in our bodies and the chlorine we consumed in moderation (as salt, sodium chloride) would be used in its proper function in our bodies, not interfering with iodine.  But, in our industrial age, we do get plenty of fluorine and bromine and these drive iodine out of our bodies.

If you drink fluoridated water or products made with fluoridated water (reconstituted juices for example) and you drink a gallon of these per day, then you are getting 3.78 mg of fluoride daily just from that source.  Water is fluoridated at 1 ppm which means that there is 1 mg in a liter of water.  If you drink a few cups of tea or a few glasses of iced tea a day, you are probably getting another 2 mg because tea plants take up a very large amount of fluorine and are generally grown in areas where soil fluorine is high.  You can get more from milk because fluorine is in phosphate rock which is mined, milled and spread on farmers fields as fertilizer, ultimately winding up in grains, vegetables, and dairy products.  You get a good dose from fluoridated toothpaste and mouthwashes; you get a good dose from pesticide residues; if you cook with teflon cookware, which is made with fluorine, you get another dose.  You easily could be getting 5 to 8 mg a day.  Now think how absurd it is for the government to set the RDA for iodine at 150 mcg (1000 mcg = 1 mg) when you are getting hundreds of times more fluorine which drives iodine out of your bodies.  You would need well more than 5 to 8 mg of iodine a day just to offset the effect of all the fluorine you are consuming.

And then there is bromine.  It is used in fertilizers.  It is sprayed on fruits and vegetables to keep them from rotting.  It is in used as a dough conditioner to make breads.  It is added to some flour. It is added to citrus flavored sodas like mountain dew. It can be in your kids' flame retarded pajamas.  The federal government recently mandated all mattresses be treated with fire retardant, and it may be in your mattress for your to absorb and breathe every night.  I don't know the numbers but you are getting a significant dose of this toxin daily which is also driving iodine our of your body.

The incidence of diseases related to iodine deficiency is on the rise.  Atrial fibrillation, once a disease affecting old people, is not increasing in young people.  There is increasing evidence that thyroid cancer, breast fibroids and cancer, uterine fibroids and cancer, ovarian cysts and ovarian cancer, enlarged prostate and cancer, and fibromyalgia are all iodine deficiency diseases.
 

 
« Last Edit: October 29, 2010, 01:19:37 AM by Sid »

Offline dodgetruckmom

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #25 on: November 04, 2010, 05:43:19 AM »

Offline ridge rover

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #26 on: November 04, 2010, 07:22:38 AM »
Surely everyone knows about these people. They recalibrated my meter a few years ago.    http://www.ki4u.com/

I haven't been on thier site recently, but they had some good info about iodine pill alternatives.

I have a nuke alert. If you keep it in your vehice when its cold, you might hear it chirping when the vehicle heats up!

Offline AtADeadRun

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #27 on: November 04, 2010, 08:02:51 AM »
I used to work in naval nuclear propulsion; there are a few of us around the board.  No reactor guy I know bothers with KI pills, either Navy or civilian, for themselves or their families.  My wife's boss, another former Navy nuke, civilian reactor tech, and now state legislator, lives a handful of miles from his old employer, the Calvert Cliffs nuclear plant.  He doesn't have them for himself or his family.  Why?

OK, there's a major radioactive material release, and you're exposed to it, and you cram yourself full of KI pills.  Result:  you don't get thyroid cancer.  You do, however, get leukemia, lung cancer, and/or liver cancer.  So much better!

If you've got every other, more pressing, prep covered, that's cool, pick these up.  But going out of your way for them isn't really helpful.

Offline nyhomesteader

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #28 on: November 04, 2010, 11:24:04 AM »
Sid great posts-- thanks!

 I do have a question, how are you so knowledgeable in this area? Are you an m.d?
I am looking to add k.i to my preps for my family. Do you or anyone have any recommendations on k.i for children in particular?

Offline nukeofhazard

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Re: Potassium Iodide
« Reply #29 on: November 04, 2010, 03:57:22 PM »
KI has its uses, but keep the limitations in mind.  It will only protect against the "uptake" of radioactive Iodine (primarily I-131) by the Thyroid gland.  I-131 is one of the byproducts of Uranium fission, with a half-life of just over 8 days.  As such, events that don't involve Uranium fission typically wouldn't merit the use of KI.

The primary event that would cause a member of the public to take radioactive Iodine into their body would be an emergency at a nuclear generating station that included fuel damage, the loss of multiple fission product barriers, and a release of radiation to the public.  If this were to occur, the two exposure pathways for radioiodine are inhalation, via direct exposure to the plume downwind, and the ingestion of contaminated food and drink.  One thing to watch for is milk from animals that have grazed on contaminated pasture.  Iodine can accumulate in milk and presents an ingestion pathway particularly where children are concerned.


nyhomesteader, the recommended dosages for KI are available on the FDA website here:
http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/EmergencyPreparedness/BioterrorismandDrugPreparedness/ucm072265.htm
http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/UCM080542.pdf

Exposures greater than 5 cGy:   
    Birth through 1 mo.  - 16 mg.
    1 mo. through 3 yrs.  - 32 mg.
    3 yrs through 18 yrs.  - 65 mg. (Adolescents>150 pounds should take adult dose.)

Exposures greater than 10 cGy:
    18 yrs through 40 yrs. - 130 mg

Exposures greater than 500 cGy:
    Adults over 40 yrs - 130 mg.