Author Topic: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?  (Read 12174 times)

Offline Marinesg1012

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 511
  • Karma: 15
  • New TSP Forum member
Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« on: April 28, 2016, 10:39:20 PM »
I am looking to install a few wireless home security cameras, we are the only house on the street, and while the dog does a great job of protecting the inside, the other day the wife came home to find he had tore the living room up, which is a clear sign someone was in the front yard for a while. I want to get some cameras to be able to view what is going on out there when no one is around. It might be beneficial to have in case someone does decide to break in and the dog gets a hold of them from a liability stand point. I want a DIY kit instead of calling out a security company since the once I have talked to said they wouldnt do it since the response time is so slow its not worth it. Either way if you guys have models or versions you have used and want to post a link that would be great, I have found a few on amazon that look decent but I am looking for some more real world experience with them.

Offline jerseyboy

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 539
  • Karma: 28
  • Garden State Prepper
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2016, 09:54:30 PM »
Any of the Foscam wireless cameras work fine..

However, don't get more than one. There usually only work on the 2.4GHz spectrum which is crazy crowded.
You can usually set it up to motion detect and upload video to an FTP server running on your desktop computer.
Get the best resolution you can afford as you want the best chance of seeing the intruder's face.

Here is a 960p wireless cameras.
Foscam FI9831P Plug and Play 960P HD H.264 Wireless/Wired Pan/Tilt IP Camera, 26-Feet Night Vision and 70 Degree Viewing Angle (Black) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00LVQ7IWA/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_PQcjxb62YAVWR

Here is an NVR which stores the video if you can't on your computerFoscam FN3004H (Black) - Supports 4 X 960p (1.3MP) IP Cameras @ 30fps Realtime, PC Web Browser Remote Access, Feature-Rich OSD with Multiple Trigger & Alarm Events, ONVIF Compliance https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01CECPUS8/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_VLcjxbBHE581G

Careful on window placement to reduce glare from the sun and reflection of the IR LEDs off the window.

(I do own a Foscam camera but not this model and not the NVR (Network Video Recorder)

Wired is better than wireless

Good luck

Jerseyboy


Offline Fyrediver

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 337
  • Karma: 22
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2016, 11:11:38 AM »
I purchased and installed 4 inexpensive Uniden cameras and recorder.  Video quality is Ok, but definitely not HD.  A bit slow to respond and start recording as well.  You get what you pay for.  This setup is around $200 for everything.  The LED on the camera is quite visible and shows when it's recording.  That's part of the issue:  let them know you're watching and being recorded.

They transmit wirelessly but still need 120VAC power run to them. 

http://www.amazon.com/Uniden-UDR744-Outdoor-Cameras-Touchscreen/dp/B00N3RQMXQ/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1462036055&sr=8-9&keywords=cameras+wireless


Offline jerseyboy

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 539
  • Karma: 28
  • Garden State Prepper
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2016, 05:03:34 PM »
If power is a problem on the IP cameras, you can use a PoE switch and a PoE camera

Foscam FI9821E POE Power Over Ethernet Megapixel HD 1280 x 720p H.264 Wired Pan/Tilt IP Camera with IR-Cut Filter - 26ft Night Vision and 2.8mm Lens (70° Viewing Angle) - Black https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00N8W2SL6/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_HutjxbG02S98Y

Or you can use a PoE injector and a PoE camera.

TP-LINK Gigabit PoE Injector Adapter (TL-PoE150S) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001PS9E5I/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_pLtjxbHDF0BVQ

Or you can you a PoE switch and a PoE splitter

TP-LINK TL-POE10R Gigabit PoE Splitter Adapter, IEEE 802.3af compliant, Up to 100 meters (328 Feet), 5V/12V Power Output https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003CFATQK/ref=cm_sw_r_awd_fHtjxbQ2C81TR

But this only works with wired networks.

Jerseyboy

Offline CharlesH

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 900
  • Karma: 21
  • Hope is a method...
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2016, 07:20:08 PM »
Any packages that come with an app for a smart phone?

Offline jerseyboy

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 539
  • Karma: 28
  • Garden State Prepper
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2016, 08:14:42 PM »
Any packages that come with an app for a smart phone?

The android application "IP Cam Viewer" will work on the same network as the IP camera. If you want to see the camera outside your network you have to put a hole in your firewall (port forwarding) which sounds as bad as it is.

Jerseyboy

Offline I.L.W.

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1004
  • Karma: 203
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2016, 08:36:44 PM »
I second Jersey's suggestions. The cameras (for your uses) need not be ultra high-end. You might need to make out a face from 100' or a license plate in the driveway. It doesn't need to look "pretty", as long as things in the focal length of the lense are recorded clearly enough to be discernable.

You're better off going with several cameras at a cheaper price than one higher end camera that has blindspots.

PoE (Power over Ethernet) makes install easy, and will be easier to secure. You can put them on their own subnet so they can't be accessed by someone wardriving. You would be shocked how many compromised home cameras there are. Virtually every wireless camera out there can be accessed easily by anyone. It's not a flaw with the camera itself (with a few notable exceptions), but with the way most wireless routers (especially those you get from your ISP) are secured.

If you use WEP encryption, I can get in with my smartphone in under 12 seconds (that's really the maximum time). WPA takes about 3 minutes on average, WPA2 can be 10 minutes up to a couple of hours, but they are all crackable.

The other side of this, it may not be someone hacking your wifi to access your camera, but instead intercepting packets from the camera to crack your wifi, lol. Even if you have really good encryption and a strong key, the cameras become a point of failure. The process or cracking wifi security comes down to intercepting as many packets of data as possible on that network, looking for commonalities in those packets, and using that to reverse engineer the encryption key (this is done through software, so even an idiot can download a wifi cracking app and use it). Wireless cameras kill your network security because they send a constant stream of packets at regular intervals, and the data is fairly uniform. If it's dark, there's no motion and the camera has compressed the image before sending it, it may end up sending the exact same image dozens of times in a row. That means the couple of hours it would normally take is reduced to just a few minutes.

This is why PoE cameras are better, and that negates concerns with interference on the 2.4Ghz spectrum. The downside is you have to run some cable.

If you go wireless, consider getting an enclosure for the camera. This serves four purposes:
• Can disguise the camera (not helpful if you want it as a visual deterrent, but in some situations you will prefer people not knowing you're recording). If I see a wireless camera, it's like hanging a big sign in front of your house saying "Hack my Network", lol. Really comes down to who you're protecting against.
• Additional protection from the elements.
• Covers the power connection (nobody can just pull the cord, it's under an enclosure which is bolted down).
• Covers the model of camera. A "hacker" doesn't know how to exploit every piece of technology, but they sure as hell know how to Google "Default Password for TP-Link Cameras". If nobody knows what kind of camera they're dealing with, you're a lot better off.

You're the only house on the street, so you're not likely to find some renegade rural hacker going door to door. If you lived in an apartment where there are 20+ wireless networks visible on your devices... well wireless cameras would surely screw you. You're probably safer than most people using them, so my advice here might seem a bit alarmist. Just keep in mind, burglars are wise to this tech. They may not be in it to hack your network, but they have the apps and they know how to use them. They check facebook posts for vacation notices to see if anyone's home, they look for "DIY" alarm systems (unmonitored) and can remotely disable many of them. Gone are the days of someone randomly kicking in your door (unless you live in a drug neighborhood)... They come prepared and it's very high-tech. Likewise, stalkers don't just follow you around and sit outside your house, they engage in cyberstalking as well now. They are well versed in information and device security (and security flaws). Crazy people are getting smarter, lol.

Quick Warning on PoE:
If they are powered by a router which also has wifi, make sure it's secured and not broadcasting the SSID. If I can access the wireless signal, I can reboot the router, thus killing your cameras for a few minutes. If I get on your network I can use a simple script to launch dozens of web requests to your router, one of which is likely the soft-reboot sequence. For example, this would kill most Frontier and Century Link modems (made by Netgear at least).

Code: [Select]
<a target=_new onclick="window.open('http://192.168.254.254/htmlV/reset.asp?restart=TRUE'); window.open('http://192.168.1.1/htmlV/reset.asp?restart=TRUE'); window.open('http://192.168.1.1/htmlV/reset.asp?restart=TRUE'); window.open('http:// 192.168.0.1/htmlV/reset.asp?restart=TRUE'); window.open('http:// 192.168.254.1/htmlV/reset.asp?restart=TRUE'); window.open('http://192.168.0.254/htmlV/reset.asp?restart=TRUE');window.open('http://192.168.1.254/htmlV/reset.asp?restart=TRUE');>Kill Netgear DSL modems</a>
I've omitted the passwords so this doesn't get used maliciously, but If I'm on your network I can poll the password and have it automatically inserted into the script. All hackers have a webpage like this on their phones, a "Skeleton Key" with hundreds of thousands of combinations of default and common passwords and modem reboot and reset URLs. This is obviously an abridged list. One click shuts down every modem/router issued by an ISP in the US, as long as you're connected to it's network.

Outdoors Only!
If the camera is monitoring your front yard, that's fine. But don't leave them running in your home. No Camera Baby monitors, or watching the pets while you're away at work. If there's an internet connected camera, whatever it captures is visible to anyone who wants to look. None of them are adequately secured. I'm not talking about the NSA, "big brother is watching you" stuff. More likely a pervert neighbor, mischievous co-worker, nosey family member... Webcams are accessible with RATs (Remote Access Tools) which are distributed as the payload in a huge variety of malware. They don't usually trigger antiviruses and go undetected unless you know to manually look for it. Additionally, many cheaper online cameras upload the data to a file host so you can view them. In many cases you have no option to secure those files, they are visible to anyone with the URL.

Do a Google Search for "inurl:view/index.shtml" to find Axis webcams for example. Here's a benign one: http://82.139.167.140:3131/view/index.shtml
So there's someone's private webcam (commercial). Imagine that camera wasn't on a public street, but in your home. If you search for the default URL patterns of these cameras, you can find lots which are in people's home. (please don't do that).


Overview:
PoE, not wireless.
Many cams, not just one on the front door.
Use enclosures.
Secure your Wireless Network (No SSID broadcast, Change the Gateway IP, assign Static IPs, turn off DHCP, Use MAC Address Whitelisting, Change the default gateway administrator password, use the strongest encryption you can, use a secure key for the encryption, not a password). The basic security stuff.



Try a web-connected motion sensor. Belkin WeMo makes one. They only cover a small area, and are not weather proof, but could work in a sheltered location by a door. Set it up, and connect it to an IFTTT.com account (free).

There you can tell it:
• "If the WeMo Motion Sensor is activated, Send me a Text Message to  {your number} saying "Someone has approached your front door".
• "If the WeMo Motion Sensor is activated, tell {web connected camera} to take a picture.
• "If the WeMo Motion Sensor is activated, tell my Philips Hue lightbulbs to turn on and glow red. (nice alert for when the pizza guy gets there, lol)

Or we can get redneck fancy with the security. Setup your web-connected motion detector so it's only monitoring motion when your phone's GPS shows you as being out of the house.  Into that you plug a small motor which coils-up (thus tightening) the slipnot you've tied into some fishing line, which is secured around the trigger of a starter pistol, stored in a locked metal box for safety and sound amplification. Now when someone approaches your door, they're greeted with the sound of gunshots! You'll never be burglarized, but you'll probably make the UPS guy piss himself, lol.

Yeah, that's a bit over the top, but the point is you can really interconnect devices and come up with any imaginable type of security system. The only limit is your creativity.

Offline michaelnz

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 28
  • Karma: 5
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2016, 02:24:54 AM »
Very useful thread. Thanks for the posts

Offline fnfalguy

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 148
  • Karma: 6
  • Ever learning...
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2016, 04:18:17 PM »
We installed a simple wireless system at the house.  It's called blink, uses an app and video is stored in the cloud.  We have been extremely happy with it thus far.  The cameras are self contained and don't require an AC plug which was our biggest issue with most of the systems we looked at.

Offline Smurf Hunter

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 7172
  • Karma: 334
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #9 on: August 17, 2016, 11:15:45 AM »
I'm interested in doing this as well.  We have an ADT monitored security alarm, with a single camera that is triggered when the front door opens.
It's got all the phone apps, cloud storage, and alerts.

I'm wondering if I'd be better off rolling my own.  For example I could install a network of Raspberry Pi controlled cameras for a fraction of the cost.  Further I could power those off low voltage, either DC wiring or lithium batteries that I change out quarterly.  Since they are basically mini-PCs, I could upload the videos to anyplace I wanted and/or local storage (they make 256GB SD cards now).

I don't want to reinvent the wheel, but I'm pretty technical and think I could do something 90% as good for a fraction of the price.

Any thoughts on this?

Offline Jack Crabb

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 773
  • Karma: 38
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #10 on: August 17, 2016, 12:45:13 PM »
Be careful where you point those things.

Webcam Nightmare: Mom Finds Young Daughters’ Bedroom On Live Streaming App http://5newsonline.com/2016/08/11/webcam-nightmare-mom-finds-young-daughters-bedroom-on-live-streaming-app/

Offline I.L.W.

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1004
  • Karma: 203
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2016, 09:37:28 AM »
The news story is a bit misleading. Nobody "Hacked" her camera. That implies she was targeted specifically. What happened is she failed to educate herself on their installation, security and usage, left it open on a publically indexable server, and a web app which looks for those cameras found it and added it to it's index.

In essence, SHE published the footage, however unwittingly. Granted the sites which index these cameras are a bit shady, but they aren't used solely by perverts and hackers. It's the intent of many people to have their cameras publically accessible. Mine are, intentionally. They aid in monitoring everything from weather to traffic in my area, and face publically viewable locations.

Worse... She's still uneducated, even after this ordeal. She changed her Wifi Password... that has nothing to do with it, lol. Might as well have changed the combination on her luggage locks, lol. She "Thinks the hackers got in through a game her kids were playing"... No... she didn't restrict the feed in the settings. And some cameras that post to a hosted server are inherently insecure, there are no settings which would make the feed private. That's rare these days, but it looks to be an older camera.

This is a real problem. Even though the mom is 100% at fault (and continues to be at fault)... this is a foreseeable circumstance. Not all consumers will have any tech skills. She thought "I'll get a camera so I can check in on the kids" and didn't think past that one use scenario. A lot of people will do that. Manufacturers need to be aware of this mass technical ineptitude and make systems which are secure by default, have easy interfaces to navigate, plain English settings, and good documentation.

The real hero here is the woman in Oregon who alerted her to this issue, who incidentally was also on the "hacker" cam feeds, lol. Yet I don't think she was herself a "hacker" or a pervert. She was using legitimate tools and found someone who was clearly out of place and unaware of their own actions, then did the right thing and alerted this mother to it. Maybe instead of jumping in front of a news camera crying "victim" and "hacker", she should sit down with the damned user manual, lol.

Offline justanotherjoe

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 88
  • Karma: 2
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2016, 03:17:22 PM »
I install cctv for a living and have regretted every wireless install to date. Couple things to attribute this to
  • Wireless devices are only as reliable at the wifi network they are connecting to, wifi equipment thats provided by your isp or sold at best buy are usually fine for normal web usage but video streaming is usually outside the scope of what it was designed for. So possibly with good wifi equipment I would have had better results but typically when a customer wants wireless cameras its because running wires is not in there budget so chances are neither is a good network
  • Most of the the wireless cameras on the market seem like they are a little on the lower quality side, im guessing theres a reason that most of the higher end brands dont bother making a wireless cam

Also unless your going to setup a solar panel chances are your going to have to run a power wire to it anyway so if your going to run a wire you might as well use a poe camera or run an ethernet plus power if you cam is not poe. With that said if someone makes one that is setup so that it records on to a local sd card and than syncs the video to another storage source via wifi that would change things. That way if the wifi drops it can still record video.

Richard (richard)

  • Guest
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2016, 08:50:21 PM »
I've had wired for several years and I would strongly discourage wireless for all the previous mentioned reasons. Before I would spend any money I would talk to your local police to find their opinion on them. Ours will not look at any footage whatsoever. If it is up to you to track down the image on your capture, it might be at your own risk. All of our cameras (4) failed within a year so I had to buy 2 new ones. Infrared images simply are not recognizable enough to be verifiable. Wide angle lens distorts and only an action motivated flood light will define images with clarity. Of all the claims I've read by manufacturers, I don't think any of them are anything more than B.S. Watch security camera footage from the news, on the internet and you will not find anything anywhere that is worthwhile to spend any money on. It is false security. I would not spend the money again. I have found other means much more effective that I will have to leave up to your imagination and creativity to duplicate.

Offline I.L.W.

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1004
  • Karma: 203
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2016, 09:12:15 AM »
Cameras only make you more secure if they act as a visual deterrent.

You are correct, 9/10 times police don't care about video footage. Unless there is someone in imminent danger, they'll just take a report. Stolen goods and vandalization don't really break the top 10 in terms of police priorities. If someone is raped or murdered in the house, yeah, they'll be interested in the footage. But that's an unlikely scenario.

The advantage of a camera is in your ability to monitor your home remotely and see what happens when you're not around. The uses are not limited to securing you from criminal activity.
• Is junior throwing a raging party while you're out of town?
• Which neighbor is bringing their dog to shit in your lawn?
• What critter is eating your garden?
• Has your package been delivered to your doorstep?
• You're coming home from work in an hour, is there 3' of snow in your driveway and you need to call the plow driver you contracted?

There are considerations before buying a camera. Will you actually use it? One camera per use. If you want to monitor your garden, it's not going to secure your home. If you want to watch the front door, it won't see the garden. One camera is of very little use.

As you add cameras, you increase the complexity of install, and the cost of storing video. If you have a 1080p feed, and 5 frames per second, even compressed, you're looking at about 5MB per minute. Multiply that by 5 cameras, and you've filled 100MB every 4 minutes. There are 1440 minutes in a day (roughly). That's 36GB of storage. At that point, you're looking at a 256GB SSD and a small PC to store it. About $400 just to store the video if you overwrite on a 5 day cycle. You're looking at $1,000 for the initial install, not $150 for a dropcam.

Cameras are useful, but if the objective is better security, there are other places I would sooner spend the money. Quality locks and a steel door guard (a metal plate that wraps around the handle to prevent kicking the door in). Security Film for your windows to prevent them from being broken. Auto-locking mechanisms for doors, and spring hinges to ensure they close completely behind you. A internet based remote for the garage door which you can set to close on a schedule, in case you forget to close it. Some nice looking, thorny bushes like roses or pyracantha to grow under the exterior windows.

And though I've said it in other threads before, an Irish Wolfhound / Pyrenees cross makes the worlds best security system. A dog that's larger than most gown men will scare off pretty much anything. On their hind legs, they'll stand 6' tall and though friendly and gentle (to people they know), the breed likes to "hug" people, throwing their paws over your shoulders and licking your face, at which point it becomes undeniably evident that they could fit your whole head in their mouth if they so choose. The Pyranees in them makes them very protective of their home and family.

I keep a couple of geese around the house. Nothing can move stealthfully past my property. If someone gets within 100 yards, they sound the alarm.

Depending on how remote a location it is, I know people who cut deep drainage ditches across their driveways. They drive over the gap on boards, but when vacationing, they can simply pack the boards up with them, and nobody is driving onto the property unless they happened to pack their own bridge, lol. The redneck drawbridge is probably the cheapest, simplest, and most effective means of protecting a remote property.

Dense perimeter hedges of osage orange will keep people out. Electric fencing for livestock will work on people too.

I'm not political, but here in NY, you can't drive anywhere without seeing signs "repeal the safe act" (the ban on assault weapons). Nobody breaks into those homes because the occupant is advertising that they are armed.

Motion activated flood lights work well, as do "vacation timers" for interior lights that will periodically turn a lamp on for a few minute, then off again, to give the illusion to people looking through the window that someone's home. If you're going out of town, get a $10 police scanner, and plug it in somewhere in the garage with the volume up.

There are a million ways to defend a home. Cameras are just one. They have their appropriate uses, and in the right cases can be a big part of your security. But it's not for everyone, and not where I would start. It's something to add on later.


Offline jd350az

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 56
  • Karma: 2
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2017, 02:02:07 PM »
Any new thoughts on this subject? Amazon links to decent setups? I don't want one as much for security as curiosity and keeping an eye on the kids. We are moving to our homestead in about 6 months and I was thinking a couple cameras might be cool. 3.5 acres, mostly to keep an eye on the kids and animals plus the ability to see who is coming down the driveway(ie mailman, friend, unknown). My cousin has one with it's own tablet for viewing, that would be cool. Being able to view over the phone or PC would be nice too but not a necessity. Any night vision cams decent enough to see wild life at night or would I be better off investing in a couple game cameras?

Offline Bosham

  • Fledgling Prepper
  • *
  • Posts: 8
  • Karma: 2
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #16 on: August 03, 2018, 07:34:33 AM »
I've used various strategies over the years, some of which have proven highly effective, and others that have yet to be tested. Here are some thoughts.

I installed a system https://secretstorages.com/best-outdoor-wireless-security-camera-system-with-dvr/ on a home in a neighborhood that had had a rash of burglaries - all while nobody was at home. The homeowner didn't care what happened while she was away - just didn't want an uninvited intruder. She had a rear porch with a sliding door that would have been a natural place for a burglar to look for an unlocked opening, b/c it was fenced with almost no visibility. Burglars also prefer sliding doors b/c they are so easy to force open with a crowbar.

One of the best elements of a system is surprise - so I planned a surprise in 2 ways. First, almost everyone who has heard a house alarm knows that they (usually) draw very little attention and are not an effective deterrent b/c they are often just not very loud. Often the only siren is on the inside of the house, and can't be heard from inside the house next door.

1st surprise - an extra-loud siren was mounted in the soffit DIRECTLY over the sliding glass door. 2nd surprise - I placed a pole in the bottom track of the door, and intentionally made it about 2 inches too short. I placed the contact so that the door had to move about one inch before the signal would activate. I also installed an extra loud siren at the front of the house, above the front door, and a flashing beacon on one of the higher roof features.

Within one week, there was a neighborhood watch meeting for the police to talk to the homeowners about all of the burglaries, and tell them to beef up their vigilance. During the meeting, the burglar went to the very house I had set up. The homeowner had, true to form, forgotten to lock the back door. I would have paid $200 to have seen his face when he felt the door start to move and then stop suddenly by the pole as the alarm went off directly over his head! Lucky for him he had to run off to change his diaper, because this time the homeowner was at home, and she was ready with her gun.

On another home (knowing how easily alarms can be defeated) I installed window contacts on the windows, and on the inside of the window shades, where they could not be seen from the outside. Same principle of surprise and redundancy, but this one has not been tried by a burglar that I know of. If the bad guy defeats the window contact, he thinks he's home free, but when he moves the blind the alarm (with multiple sirens in key positions) goes off like gangbusters.

The homeowners were overall happy with this setup, but had a few false alarms until they trained themselves not to move the blinds after the alarm was set. They were mini-blinds, with the contacts mounted to the window-sill at the bottom. This enabled the homeowner to turn them open or closed with the alarm set, but not to raise them.

Think about surprising the bad guy, having redundant security measures, etc. . . Also, try out sdepot.com website or look up security system wholesalers for your area. Any electrician can usually buy the stuff from them (very cheap), and help you with questions - especially if you can find one who's willing to barter a little.

Hope this helps.

Offline David in MN

  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 2184
  • Karma: 170
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #17 on: August 03, 2018, 08:23:24 AM »
Just another aspect to keep in mind...

I helped install trail cameras at our gun club. For the past couple years we've been dealing with people who come onto the property at night and shoot a few rounds of skeet and then leave with the very expensive marine batteries we use to power our throwers. So over the course of these years we've locked the throwing houses to no avail and eventually put up cameras.

Well I can have pictures of people illegally entering the property, clear photos of their car and license plate, and even images of the actual perpetrators but it's of no use if the police choose not to pursue. Then you get bogged down asking for help from a department who will tell you that "there is no evidence these are repeat offenders" and "I can only make out half the license plate" (as though having half the plate and the make & model isn't enough) or "you didn't record any actual damage" or "we don't have a forensic team".

It's all a pile of bullshit largely stemming from the fact that the thieves are Native Americans and the city police don't want to deal with the tribal police or get the county involved so the criminals walk free.

What I'm getting at is that you might have real evidence but it's all for naught in the hands of a police department unwilling to do anything. If your house is vandalized for a month and you put up a camera and catch a guy lurking around with a crowbar and spray paint there's at least onwe police department who will tell you that you have no actual evidence because you didn't really record the crime. It's frustrating and we all know what the truth is but it is what it is. We spent thousands to get useless evidence.

Offline LvsChant

  • Resident Master Mudder
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 7293
  • Karma: 603
Re: Thoughts on wireless security camera systems?
« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2018, 09:46:44 AM »
Thanks, Bosham... sounds like your methods may help deter home robberies...