Author Topic: Candles  (Read 5070 times)

Offline Yooper53

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Candles
« on: June 05, 2016, 05:54:10 PM »
What does everyone like for emergency candles. We need to get a supply for our home. Will have to order as we only have the Mart store here. Never bought them so looking for insight and source. Thank you all.

Offline archer

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Re: Candles
« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2016, 05:58:24 PM »

Offline Bolomark

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Re: Candles
« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2016, 06:09:20 PM »
for light?
for heat/cooking?
good for long term storage no worrying about spoilage.
how about an Aladdin lamp? better source of light.
use care to prevent fires.

Offline Carl

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Re: Candles
« Reply #3 on: June 05, 2016, 06:26:34 PM »
I prefer to use solar charged lanterns or battery powered that can be charged by my solar supply,so much better than fire.

Offline Bolomark

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Re: Candles
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2016, 06:40:36 PM »
yes power goes out around here , and i drag out a couple of this style lights.
Streamlight 44931 The Siege Lantern
by Streamlight

endurance

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Re: Candles
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2016, 06:51:01 PM »
I'm pretty much done with candles now, too. My 83 year old uncle had a candle accident last fall that resulted in so much smoke damage to the home that they moved into a rental and decided to scrape the home. There's too many safer alternatives now days to bother with them. I can buy a set of solar outdoor lights for $20 that will last longer than $20 in candles and pose zero risk to my home.

Now, the only candles I allow in the house are the kinds that come in a jar with a solid base, away from draperies and clothing for ornimental purposes only.

Offline RitaRose1945

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Re: Candles
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2016, 08:23:21 PM »
I'm pretty much done with candles now, too. My 83 year old uncle had a candle accident last fall that resulted in so much smoke damage to the home that they moved into a rental and decided to scrape the home. There's too many safer alternatives now days to bother with them. I can buy a set of solar outdoor lights for $20 that will last longer than $20 in candles and pose zero risk to my home.

Now, the only candles I allow in the house are the kinds that come in a jar with a solid base, away from draperies and clothing for ornimental purposes only.


Yet again, agreeing with Endurance.


Candles are literally an accident waiting to happen.  And no matter how careful you are, people fall asleep or trip, or the wind blows a curtain, or something happens.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Candles
« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2016, 07:09:59 AM »
I would only use (and store about 100 of) tea candles.
Can be easily protected from contact, and if turned over the molten parafin chokes the flame.
One can easily make DIY heavy bases for them

Offline Knecht

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Re: Candles
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2016, 07:57:34 AM »
I store every candle I come by. Any candle is better than nothing. Prefer them to any electrical lights, solar or crank or whatever. Candles won't break, won't corrode. Any leftovers can be remelted and cast again. Both real wax and parafine can be used for other things (waterproofing, sealing various gaps, also great for shotshell sealing). I also store generally around 10kg of beeswax, which I'm using for work when making historical replicas. For finishing/rustproofing hot iron, leather, wood, fabric, shoes....
Also storing couple jars of rendered tallow, get it for free at the slaughterhouse and just dice it and heat it in old pot on fire. Zero cost, lots of uses (basically the same as beeswax, plus it's edible and won't go rancid if processed and stored well).

Offline Stwood

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Re: Candles
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2016, 08:01:04 PM »
Stock up and buy the cheapest candles we can find on sale. We put them in tin cans when we use them for light, if the power goes out.

Have a couple of old kerosene lamps, + I bought 2 more new ones last year.
Need to get fuel for them... ::)

Offline RitaRose1945

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Re: Candles
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2016, 08:57:27 PM »
Stock up and buy the cheapest candles we can find on sale. We put them in tin cans when we use them for light, if the power goes out.


That reminds me of something else - when I light a candle and want a little more light from it, I'll put it next to a mirror.


Sounds silly, but it works.

Offline Stwood

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Re: Candles
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2016, 09:59:53 PM »
 8) Yes.
Years ago, I made hanging oil lamp holders. I put mirrors in them. Worked well, until we tired of them.
Should have kept them around I suppose, but can't keep everything

Offline Knecht

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Re: Candles
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2016, 05:53:20 AM »
BTW, empty rolls of toilet paper or towels make great mold for casting candles. You can also make them by dipping or rolling of course.

Offline allofthemonkeys

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Re: Candles
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2016, 03:32:11 PM »
I think the reason that they are so popular is that as long as they don't melt or get the wicks wet, they are ready to go. No fuel going stale, batteries dying or corroding.

Offline Yooper53

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Re: Candles
« Reply #14 on: June 26, 2016, 11:57:38 AM »
Bolomark, thanks for the info on the Streamlight. I went with the AA version. Small, well built and good light  in a easy to carry package.

Offline Carl

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Re: Candles
« Reply #15 on: June 26, 2016, 06:55:54 PM »
I will backtrack a bit from my first comment and say a candle-lantern might be acceptable...but I use no flames in my home though I have candles in my camping/fire starting gear.

Offline outoforder2day

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Re: Candles
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2016, 02:45:19 PM »
Tealights are ok, but tend to burn out quick. Those other "emergency" candles tend to be expensive. I prefer budget prayer candles. You can usually get them for $1-$2 each, and they're designed to burn for a loooong time (7+ days). Since they're in glass, they are also safer than exposed candles, though there have been some concerns about lead in the wicks on the cheap ones. Here is an example: https://www.dollartree.com/Glass-Jar-Candles-8-/p334989/index.pro

If you're going the tealight route, a safety suggestion: Put the candle in a mason jar. Instant flame guard.