Author Topic: Bone stock/broth  (Read 1026 times)

Offline drjeep33

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Bone stock/broth
« on: February 21, 2017, 07:35:01 PM »
A few years back, Jack produced an episode in which he discussed the better ways of producing home made bone stock/broths. I cannot find the episode on TSP.com search box. Can someone provide the episode number?
Thanks.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Bone stock/broth
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2017, 07:58:42 PM »
I don't know the episode, but I roast the bones in the oven first, then do a huge stockpot of the bones, veggies...Then strain and can.

Cedar
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Offline Charlie17

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Re: Bone stock/broth
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2017, 12:39:52 PM »
Here is what I do for chicken stock:

Roast left over backs, necks, wings, etc on 375 for about 45 minutes

Let cool and pick off any meat. 

Rough cut a couple onion and sauté in the bottom of the pot I use for stock

Add half the roasted, picked over bones into the pot with the onions along with any juices from roasting.

Add a layer of chicken feet.

Add the rest of the roasted, picked over bones.

Fill with hot water till just covering the bones.

Add a couple glugs of white vinegar.

Add a small handful of whole peppercorns.

Bring to a boil and then back down to a very low simmer and simmer for at least 24 hours.

Skim off the yuck as needed.

Skim off the rendered chicken fat and save for cooking (only the clear stuff).

Strain stock through a colander and then through cheese cloth.

Can.

Most times the flavor is so rich that I don't even have to add salt.  We use our home grown pasture raised, Non-GMO fed chickens for this.  When in the fridge, it sets up stiffer than jello and when we use it for chicken soup we cut it 1 part stock to about 3-4 parts water.  Talk about delicious and really good for you too!


In the Cincinnati Area?  Visit us at Ironweed Farm - Pasture Raised Chickens

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Bone stock/broth
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2017, 06:10:31 PM »
I don't know the episode either... but I always make my own chicken stock...

Whenever we have roasted chicken, I just save the carcass in the freezer. Once I get a few of them, I pull out my giant stock pot and make a big batch.

I follow the Barefoot Contessa's basic recipe...

Quartered onions
Scrubbed carrots
Celery stalks
Garlic cloves (halved)
Parsnips (if I have them)
dill weed
parsley
thyme
kosher salt to taste

Bring to boil, then simmer as long as you can stand it...

Let cool overnight... skim off the fat; freeze or can.

This makes the best ever soup base...




Online David in MN

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Re: Bone stock/broth
« Reply #4 on: February 22, 2017, 08:28:49 PM »
I do this once or twice per week in the fall/ winter.

In a slow cooker I use:

Leftover bones
1 or 2 roasted marrow bones
1 onion
2 stalk celery
2 carrots
2 cloves garlic
fresh parsley
2 T apple cider vinegar
salt to taste

Set on low for 24 hours. Strain/filter/clean/etc.

If you do this it will produce a broth so rich mine often gelatinize in the fridge.

By far my favorite use is beef bones turned into a German soup of beef bone broth, mushrooms, parsley, and dumplings. When my mother ate it she said it was the richest thing she'd ever eaten. She actually complained that my soup was so decadent it should have been a sip of amuse bouche rather than a meal.
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