Author Topic: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup  (Read 4875 times)

Offline survivalmz

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DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« on: March 11, 2017, 11:29:12 PM »
What I am looking for is recommendations for the inverter/Charger with Auto Transfer Switch.

We have a Grandson that we have custody of that has a variety of health problems due to his mother's water breaking at 13 weeks and being born 3 months early. At this time he has been home for 6 months and is on a ventilator and Oxygen 24x7 as well as a feeding pump, suction machine and monitoring equipment.

We want a backup UPS and a battery bank to increase our power outage preparedness.

I just got a Honda Eu2000i Generator and have purchased 4 US Battery GC2 232Ah batteries. What I am looking for is recommendations for the inverter/Charger with Auto Transfer Switch. Steve Harris suggests the $350 Royal Power 2000W Inverter charger. The reviews are not great and 20A charger seems to be a little low for a 460Ah battery back. Aims Power has some PSW units that are in the $600 range that have up to 70A 4 stage charging. From there you get into Victron and Magnum i the $1200-1400 range which is getting a little crazy expensive even though I'm already at $550 in batteries alone.

Here are the power load requirements (watts vary some, but I am erring on the high side)
40 Watts - LVT Ventilator
54 Watts - Heater with Heated Wire Average 54 Watts per hour surge to 120 watts
27 Watts - Suction machine  27 watts while suctioning and 8 watts while charging
5  watts - Pulse oximeter
5 Watts - feeding pump
350 Watts - Oxygen Concentrator (the power hog)
481 Watts Total

The purpose of the battery bank and UPS would be to provide instant power for the medical equipment to stay on while we get the generator set up and running. We are looking into a whole house natural gas generator, but the cost seems to be out of our range for right now and we don't have gas installed to the house right now. We do have big oxygen tanks we could use in place of the concentrator to save power. They will last a long time if completely full.



Offline Carl

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2017, 06:18:27 AM »
  My first thoughts are the Harris suggested setup would do well. This is a reliable inverter: I would have TWO of them ,wired to the batteries,and FUSES.I am not qualified to deal with medical equipment,so I only address the power and charging of batteries.

https://www.amazon.com/Royal-Power-PIC3000-12-Inverter-Transfer/dp/B007ZT10DU/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1489317870&sr=1-2&keywords=auto+switch+inverter+charger

XANTREX makes a 1000 and 1800 watt auto switching inverter and the multi stage charger on the 1800 is up to 40 amps,it is well designed and should serve well...I have an earlier 1600 watt,auto switched ,inverter only that has served me well for over 10 years and I got it used...

https://www.amazon.com/Xantrex-Freedom-806-1840-Inverter-Charger/dp/B00DA0CXUC/ref=sr_1_2?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1489320761&sr=1-2&keywords=xantrex+inverter+charger

https://www.amazon.com/XANTREX-FREEDOM-INVERTER-CHARGER-Current/dp/B00KOED9PK/ref=sr_1_3?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1489320761&sr=1-3&keywords=xantrex+inverter+charger

The charger ,of up to 20 amps is proper as it keeps the batteries charged and at a proper rate ,even for your battery bank, to not be over worked and stressed by charging...C10 or CAPACITY divided by 10 hours ...determines designed charge/discharge rate for a battery bank in most manufacturers opinions.Your battery bank has four 6 volt batteries and at 10 amps charge per pair in series is about as high a charge rate as most will suggest being correct for such a battery bank so as to promote battery life.

  A 40 amp charger would exceed the C10 rate for FOUR 6 Volt batteries in series -parallel,and, in my opinion ,will cause batteries to outgas during charging and cause Hydrogen sulphide gas and water loss from the cells and neither of these are good indoors or near people and electronics and this shortens the useful battery life.

  As this is a short duration system ,the oxygen concentrator is OK...but it can save a lot more run time if you just use the bottled oxygen instead when a brief to mid range power outage occurs.

  The hospital should have a social worker with available plans for such devices and economic help as well...ask.



 
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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2017, 06:47:17 PM »
  My first thoughts are the Harris suggested setup would do well. This is a reliable inverter: I would have TWO of them ,wired to the batteries,and FUSES.I am not qualified to deal with medical equipment,so I only address the power and charging of batteries.
Thanks Carl for replying. I have read through some of your answers on here. Yeah ignore the medical aspect of the equipment. It all runs on modified sine wave, although I haven't tested the oxygen concentrator yet. There is a lithium battery pack that won't charge with MSW, but it will charge on 12V DC with the right cable. Typical medical stuff, the 12V cigarette lighter plug to ventilator connector is $250. it's an odd locking connector I can't figure out what it is:


I've asked about backup plans, etc and no one really has a solution. They supply us with one big O2 cylinder and 2 batteries and a charger that will power the ventilator for 9 hours each I believe. They pretty much say register with your utility company and I called them and they don't do priority service restoration for medical reasons. We could go to the fire dept or if nothing else to the hospital as a last resort.

Luckily He's only on 1/8L of oxygen so the tanks will last a long time. I should look into a more efficient concentrator because we would like to take him camping in the future, so this can serve that function in the future.

XANTREX makes a 1000 and 1800 watt auto switching inverter and the multi stage charger on the 1800 is up to 40 amps,it is well designed and should serve well...I have an earlier 1600 watt,auto switched ,inverter only that has served me well for over 10 years and I got it used...

The 1800 Watt Xantrex looks good to me spec wise. Does HF stand for high frequency? I read somewhere Low Frequency was better, heavier duty etc. The only reason I was shying away from Xantrex is reading in a few of the sailboat forums, those guys are in some cases reporting the reliability of Xantrex is not what it once was and that they have bought up a lot of other companies. It is hard to sort out what is true.

The charger ,of up to 20 amps is proper as it keeps the batteries charged and at a proper rate ,even for your battery bank, to not be over worked and stressed by charging...C10 or CAPACITY divided by 10 hours ...determines designed charge/discharge rate for a battery bank in most manufacturers opinions.Your battery bank has four 6 volt batteries and at 10 amps charge per pair in series is about as high a charge rate as most will suggest being correct for such a battery bank so as to promote battery life.

  A 40 amp charger would exceed the C10 rate for FOUR 6 Volt batteries in series -parallel,and, in my opinion ,will cause batteries to outgas during charging and cause Hydrogen sulphide gas and water loss from the cells and neither of these are good indoors or near people and electronics and this shortens the useful battery life.
I have this concern as well. Here's what the on the batteries say http://usbattery.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/usb_2200_data_2015_WEB.pdf:

1. Bulk Charge Constant current @~10% of C/20 Ah in amps to 2.45+/-0.05 volts per cell
(e.g. 7.35 volts +/-0.15 volts per 6 volt battery)
2. Absorption Charge Constant voltage (2.45+/-0.05 vpc) to 3% of C/20 Ah in amps then hold for 2-3 hours and terminate charge
Charge termination can be by maximum time (2-4 hr) or dV/dt (4 mv/cell per hour)


Looking at the Ah chart, 10hr rate is 206Ah, 20hr rate is 232Ah.
So if I have 2 6V in series to get 12V and those pairs in Parallel, I should have a 462 Ah 12V battery bank.

If I use US Battery's formula for bulk charging, 10% of 232Ah(C20) = 23 Amps for bulk charging. This is for 1 battery. I assume another battery in series won't change that, but when I put the pairs of series batteries in parallel the Amp Hours increase from 232Ah to 464Ah. If I continue to use their formula it would be 10% of 464Ah = 46 Amps for the bulk charging phase.

 I certainly want battery life. So where does the 10 amps per pair of 6V guideline come from? Reading the US Battery charging recommendations it seems 10amps is less than half of their bulk charging recommendation. http://usbattery.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/usb-charging-recommendations.pdf
I found this interesting "Third, the charging process should charge the battery at a voltage and/or charge rate at the end of charge that will result in controlled gassing of the electrolyte. This gassing is required to mix the electrolyte to prevent stratification. Without proper mixing of the electrolyte, the heavier acid generated during charging can sink to the bottom of the cell and will adversely affect performance and life of the battery."

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2017, 03:58:40 AM »
Good on you for taking this on and digging into the technical aspects.  +1

I would also work on the human network angle of this as well.  Getting to know electricians, medical equipment repair folks, first responders and handy folks around the neighborhood would probably be value added.  You never know when their personal relationship with you and yours would help keep your priorities high in their prioritization even when the world is going mad.

I will not comment further since my technical expertise is considerably behind the current level of the conversation.
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Offline Carl

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2017, 05:51:22 AM »
  Your second post tells me that you do have good skill in what you are doing and likely are looking for validation of your ideas. The XANTREX line used to be 'the' industrial strength type of heavy duty inverters as they were made for operation in the worst environments. The company made a move into 'consumer' inverters about 6 years ago and most are over rated and use mass production techniques ...BUT , you get one that will operate at about 25% of it's continuous rating and not use it in the high humidity and caustic sea salt air and they are still a great value and have few problems. I might suggest that you get a separate inverter and charger to provide your needs and tailor your system better to your situation.

  I agree that a 40 amp or so BULK CHARGE for your battery bank would be beneficial ...once a month or so but the mixing of the electrolyte actually occurs at the C10 or one tenth amp hour capacity during charge OR discharge and so the suggested 20 amp (10 amps per 12 volt string) would charge ,and mix the acid well when combined with the 50 amp or so discharge and the lower current would not boil away nearly as much water from the cells.

  A separate inverter and charger will not effect your budget substantially and provide greater flexibility. I would only do such BULK CHARGING in a well ventilated area , away from the child and breathing difficulties as the batteries will outgas when in bulk charge to a greater level than when in discharge.
I have always done a monthly ,C10 discharge of my cells,as they are indoors and the two 125 amp hour batteries (in parallel) are normally charged at only 6 amps from solar or a three stage SCHUMACHER charger at a similar slow rate as the batteries are (just as your system ) float charged and rarely discharged. I would use a 3 stage ,high frequency charger as I have done for 12 years now on my 'house' inverter that runs the fridge and lights as backup and also gets EXERCISED once a month.

  I am not telling you what,or how,to do your task...just how I have done it successfully for many years after mistakes taught me what not to do.If your batteries are in another area ,away from the people,I would still only do a discharge/recharge on a monthly 15 minute test...even if you just run a space heater at 500 to 1000 watts as I do for testing and exercise of the battery chemistry. I log time and voltage to determine battery 'health' and deside when the batteries are nearing replacement time.

  I would run a link or switch so as to charge the batteries in ONE 12 volt pair at a time for the BULK charge,but due to the HIGH FREQUENCY of the charger...not at above 15 AMPS. So ,if it were me ,I would use something like the inverter and charger listed below.

Inverter:
https://www.amazon.com/Xantrex-806-1810-appliances-electronics-connected/dp/B00MEOC1DE/ref=sr_1_8?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1489405797&sr=1-8&keywords=inverter&refinements=p_n_feature_keywords_two_browse-bin%3A7067174011%2Cp_89%3AXantrex
or
https://www.amazon.com/KRI%C3%8BGER-KR1500-Inverter-Outlets-Installation/dp/B00DNL05GW/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1489405612&sr=1-1&keywords=inverter&refinements=p_n_feature_keywords_two_browse-bin%3A7067174011
or
https://www.amazon.com/Xantrex-XPower-Inverter-Remote-UL458/dp/B00KFJGAW8/ref=sr_1_14?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1489405235&sr=1-14&keywords=xantrex

cHARGER:
https://www.amazon.com/Schumacher-SSC-1500A-CA-SpeedCharge-Charger-Battery/dp/B000H961YI/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1489405350&sr=1-1&keywords=schumacher+battery+charger
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Offline idelphic

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2017, 07:56:26 AM »
a post not worth .002 cents:
Quote
We have a Grandson that we have custody of that has a variety of health problems due to his mother's water breaking at 13 weeks and being born 3 months early. At this time he has been home for 6 months and is on a ventilator and Oxygen 24x7 as well as a feeding pump, suction machine and monitoring equipment.
Very sorry to hear this - Children should be exempted for things like this.  Though they likely will grow to be stronger later in life.

Quote
We want a backup UPS and a battery bank to increase our power outage preparedness.

I just got a Honda Eu2000i Generator and have purchased 4 US Battery GC2 232Ah batteries. What I am looking for is recommendations for the inverter/Charger with Auto Transfer Switch. Steve Harris suggests the $350 Royal Power 2000W Inverter charger. The reviews are not great and 20A charger seems to be a little low for a 460Ah battery back. Aims Power has some PSW units that are in the $600 range that have up to 70A 4 stage charging. From there you get into Victron and Magnum i the $1200-1400 range which is getting a little crazy expensive even though I'm already at $550 in batteries alone.

Batteries are used for short term, and should only be used as such really.  The amount of power needed to charge them can be more than you supply - especially via a single charger to a bank of four as you have.  An analogy:  You could put out a forest fire with a firehose, but likely you will consume all the fuel (forest) before hand. 

Nothing wrong with using a 20A charger to charge your bank - it will just take longer to do so.  Charging the bank from the Generator isn't the best idea either (IMO) as you are generally taking DC power converting it to AC and then back to DC with the 20A charger.

While I will never suggest you do this as you are dealing with life, but a direct connection to a generator running an alternator may provide better / faster charging (home built genny with 80Amp alternator ...)

Quote
Here are the power load requirements (watts vary some, but I am erring on the high side)
40 Watts - LVT Ventilator
54 Watts - Heater with Heated Wire Average 54 Watts per hour surge to 120 watts
27 Watts - Suction machine  27 watts while suctioning and 8 watts while charging
5  watts - Pulse oximeter
5 Watts - feeding pump
350 Watts - Oxygen Concentrator (the power hog)
481 Watts Total

With this load - round up to a 500w load,.. but for sake of precautions,.. go with a 1000w.  plenty of 'safety' room.

I'm starting to change my thoughts on the matter,.. before I wouldn't consider a higher Wattage inverter to keep the power losses down, but many today are smart and will size the current draw to the load.. so a good bit more efficient.

Quote
The purpose of the battery bank and UPS would be to provide instant power for the medical equipment to stay on while we get the generator set up and running. We are looking into a whole house natural gas generator, but the cost seems to be out of our range for right now and we don't have gas installed to the house right now.

Correct - that is the way to go...  You can also use the Battery Bank as a balancer - on occasion the genny may dip or spike, and the bank with smooth that out.

Quote
We do have big oxygen tanks we could use in place of the concentrator to save power. They will last a long time if completely full.

Never count on it being full. 
 
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Offline outoforder2day

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2017, 08:47:42 AM »
I wouldn't want to take chances on something like this. It's life-critical, not a DIY project. A 1500 kva UPS can be had for well under $1000. It can handle the load you detailed, and it will give you a loud alarm when power is lost. Since oxygen concentrators can charge tanks, I would keep a spare tank or two topped up at all times and not run the concentrator on the battery backup for more than a minute or two while you cut over to the tank.

This unit, plus an extra battery, would be under $500 and would keep that load running for quite a while. It's integrated, all in one, and was engineered for expensive, critical equipment. There are also better models out there there that add a lot for right around $1k. We run this unit in my office.
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Offline outoforder2day

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2017, 08:50:32 AM »
If you really want to DIY, and you are anywhere near eastern PA, I will give you a UPS like one of the ones above, sans batteries. I pulled it from my switching closet and replaced it with a new unit because it hit it's 3-year official lifespan. I was going to hook it up to some deep cycle batteries and run it in my shack, but this is a much more important use. It's too heavy to ship though. Probably around 60+ lbs.
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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2017, 07:08:31 PM »
Been a horrible week with work and nonstop problems. I'll try to get back to this thread tomorrow.

Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2017, 06:54:58 AM »
  Your second post tells me that you do have good skill in what you are doing and likely are looking for validation of your ideas. The XANTREX line used to be 'the' industrial strength type of heavy duty inverters as they were made for operation in the worst environments. The company made a move into 'consumer' inverters about 6 years ago and most are over rated and use mass production techniques ...BUT , you get one that will operate at about 25% of it's continuous rating and not use it in the high humidity and caustic sea salt air and they are still a great value and have few problems. I might suggest that you get a separate inverter and charger to provide your needs and tailor your system better to your situation.
Good points and the separate charger inverter was not something I had thought of only because of the "convenience" factor of the transfer switch in the all in one units.

Right now I guess I have a few unknowns or questions.
1. Batteries in the living area near the equipment that needs power or Batteries in the basement? If they can't or shouldn't be in the living area, then the whole all in one unit/auto transfer switch is a moot point. If the bank is in the basement, then I just set it up so when the power is out, you go to the basement, turn on the inverter, grab the extension cord, run it up the steps and plug into a power strip and start powering the equipment. After an hour or so, decide if starting the generator is needed.

2. The risks of gasses coming from the batteries during charging. Listening to Steve Harris, he described it as a mouse fart, but I have seen a few mentions on here that sound like there is more serious ventilation needed. I thought the whole idea of a smart charger was to prevent overheating and overcharging that results in boiling off the electrolyte and damaging batteries. Many of the Magnum energy, and Victron units have 80-100 amp chargers, but they have battery temperature sensors. Are these units smarter or able to adjust or be adjusted to charge with less amps? Thinking about the marine applications I see many of these battery banks that appear to be installed in the living areas of the sailboats. If these high amp charger inverters were causing problems with gassing and boiling away electrolyte I would expect to hear a lot of discussion about it.

I did find this article on installing a marine battery charger and they were talking about the Sterling Pro Charge ultra https://marinehowto.com/installing-a-marine-battery-charger/ I guess this is the source of my conflicting ideas about the size of the charger as they mention the ability to charge at higher amps with multiple charging profiles and the ability to reduce the current of the charge.


I would run a link or switch so as to charge the batteries in ONE 12 volt pair at a time for the BULK charge,but due to the HIGH FREQUENCY of the charger...not at above 15 AMPS. So ,if it were me ,I would use something like the inverter and charger listed below.
I had not thought about separating the pairs. What is the benefit?

Very sorry to hear this - Children should be exempted for things like this.  Though they likely will grow to be stronger later in life.
Thanks! He's pretty tough. The night he was born they were trying to convince us to turn off life support because he would only live a few hours and he turns 3 this week.

If you really want to DIY, and you are anywhere near eastern PA, I will give you a UPS like one of the ones above, sans batteries. I pulled it from my switching closet and replaced it with a new unit because it hit it's 3-year official lifespan. I was going to hook it up to some deep cycle batteries and run it in my shack, but this is a much more important use. It's too heavy to ship though. Probably around 60+ lbs.
That is an awful nice offer. I am just South of Baltimore, MD - how far is that? What model and what are the specs? Things are getting a little less busy in our lives with the boy so might be possible.

Offline Carl

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2017, 07:27:22 AM »
  Gassing is not an explosive risk usually until a cell boils dry and the battery can explode. When properly maintained there is little real risk.
Keep the suggested charge/discharge parameters in mind and all should go well. I felt adding Hydrogen Sulphide gas to the environment of
a person with breathing difficulty might be a concern. I just added my perspective of how I would do it ,your child is tough so caustic fumes
and acid really can't cause much problem.


The sulfuric acid in a lead acid battery is highly corrosive and is more harmful than acids used in most other battery systems. Contact with eye can cause permanent blindness; swallowing damages internal organs that can lead to death. First aid treatment calls for flushing the skin for 10–15 minutes with large amounts of water to cool the affected tissue and to prevent secondary damage. Immediately remove contaminated clothing and thoroughly wash the underlying skin. Always wear protective equipment when handling sulfuric acid.

Charging batteries in living quarters should be safe, and this also applies to lead acid. Ventilate the area regularly as you would a kitchen when cooking. Lead acid produces some hydrogen gas but the amount is minimal when charged correctly. Hydrogen gas becomes explosive at a concentration of 4 percent. This would only be achieved if large lead acid batteries were charged in a sealed room.

Over-charging a lead acid battery can produce hydrogen sulfide. The gas is colorless, very poisonous, flammable and has the odor of rotten eggs. Hydrogen sulfide also occurs naturally during the breakdown of organic matter in swamps and sewers; it is present in volcanic gases, natural gas and some well waters. Being heavier than air, the gas accumulates at the bottom of poorly ventilated spaces. Although noticeable at first, the sense of smell deadens the sensation with time and potential victims may be unaware of its presence.

As a simple guideline, hydrogen sulfide becomes harmful to human life if the odor is noticeable. Turn off the charger, vent the facility and stay outside until the odor disappears

When charging an SLA with over-voltage, current limiting must be applied to protect the battery. Always set the current limit to the lowest practical setting and observe the battery voltage and temperature during charge. In case of rupture, leaking electrolyte or any other cause of exposure to the electrolyte, flush with water immediately. If eye exposure occurs, flush with water for 15 minutes and consult a physician immediately. Wear approved gloves when touching electrolyte, lead and cadmium. On exposure to skin, flush with water immediately.

Copied and pasted as it is tough for me to type.

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/health_concerns
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Offline outoforder2day

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2017, 11:27:00 AM »
...
That is an awful nice offer. I am just South of Baltimore, MD - how far is that? What model and what are the specs? Things are getting a little less busy in our lives with the boy so might be possible.

I work in Conshohocken, PA, so not too far at all. Let me get the model tonight. I'll power it up as well to make sure it's still functioning as expected. I'll PM you with the details.
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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2017, 07:20:58 PM »
...your child is tough so caustic fumes and acid really can't cause much problem...
Dude. What was that for?

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #13 on: March 23, 2017, 04:23:49 AM »
Dude. What was that for?

A poor attempt at humor in a tough situation. Also trying to voice the low level of danger from the use of batteries.
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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #14 on: March 23, 2017, 05:33:04 AM »
Dude. What was that for?
\
I really can't overstate my opinion that having the batteries in the same area as people is not a good idea as even though well maintained cells do not often explode...they all produce gas when charged or discharged ,at any level of current, and your discharge of 50 amps or so and wanting to charge at levels I consider to be high and cause more gassing than I would call safe ,especially when the gas is heavier than air and concentrates near the floor (and the child) I found your negating of the hazards of a flea fart as not an idea I would share. I shared my thoughts as I felt child safety was a concern .
Please just do as you want and ignore my input.
« Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 05:47:58 AM by Carl »
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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #15 on: March 23, 2017, 12:03:49 PM »
A poor attempt at humor in a tough situation. Also trying to voice the low level of danger from the use of batteries.
OK, I hear you.

\
I really can't overstate my opinion that having the batteries in the same area as people is not a good idea as even though well maintained cells do not often explode...they all produce gas when charged or discharged ,at any level of current, and your discharge of 50 amps or so and wanting to charge at levels I consider to be high and cause more gassing than I would call safe ,especially when the gas is heavier than air and concentrates near the floor (and the child) I found your negating of the hazards of a flea fart as not an idea I would share. I shared my thoughts as I felt child safety was a concern .
Please just do as you want and ignore my input.
I wanted these opinions, so I do want to hear feedback if I am taking risks I should not. If something happened to him that I caused I would never forgive myself. He/We spent over 800 days and nights in the hospital after he was born and have been through hell and back and heard more times than I can remember that there was nothing more they could do and that they were sorry they couldn't have done more to save him.


I think I will give up on the auto/transfer aspect and put the battery bank downstairs in the basement and have it set up where someone can easily flip on a switch to the inverter and unroll an extension cord up the basement steps and into the room where everything is and just plug in the power strip. He will be without supplemental oxygen but someone is with him 24/7 so they can temporarily hook up a tank. The room has an emergency light and several flashlights.

Offline outoforder2day

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #16 on: March 23, 2017, 01:01:26 PM »
I'm sorry I didn't get to the pictures last night. I think my wife moved the ups. Will try to locate it again tonight.
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Offline outoforder2day

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #17 on: March 24, 2017, 10:15:56 AM »
Got the model. It's a CyberPower OL2000. Basically the older model of this one https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-OR2200PFCRT2U-Sinewave-2000VA-Compatible/dp/B003OJAHW0

This is how the batteries are wired for it.
https://goo.gl/photos/AGGzho1mfvoLZ4dD6

I believe I have the cables for the batteries as well.
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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #18 on: March 24, 2017, 11:17:18 AM »
I did find out that at the rate of oxygen he is on, I think it makes sense to save the 350 watts for the concentrator and use the tank. Even 1/3 full, (1000psi) the calculation is 6-7 days of 24 hour a day oxygen. We have 2 of those tanks plus 4 D tanks and 3 M6, but we would save them if we had to go mobile.

Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #19 on: March 24, 2017, 09:30:46 PM »
Got the model. It's a CyberPower OL2000. Basically the older model of this one https://www.amazon.com/CyberPower-OR2200PFCRT2U-Sinewave-2000VA-Compatible/dp/B003OJAHW0

This is how the batteries are wired for it.
https://goo.gl/photos/AGGzho1mfvoLZ4dD6

I believe I have the cables for the batteries as well.
So are those four 6V batteries wired for 12V? or 4 12V? What size can fit in there?

When you mentioned hooking it up to a deep cycle battery were you talking about trying to fit something within the case or separate?
Just trying to understand my options for batteries to get it up and running.

Offline outoforder2day

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #20 on: March 27, 2017, 08:53:20 AM »
I was going to use it as the charge controller for a few deep cycle batteries below it for longer run time. I was going to use Anderson Powerpolls (heavy duty) and build a harness for them.

Pretty sure they were 12v batteries, but you should hook up a multimeter to the UPS leads and check.
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Offline Carl

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #21 on: March 27, 2017, 09:41:08 AM »
  The UPS uses 4 of the 12 volt @ 9 Amp hour batteries,wired for 24 volts.

If you thought 20 amps charging was too low then you really are in for a surprise as this unit likely has a 2 amp or so charger built in and will be sadly slow when you try to use it alone to charge your battery bank...An auxiliary charger will be needed and I still suggest a Schumacher 3 stage charger.
Also note that an UPS of this size in often not designed for continuous running of long duration though it should run long enough to get the generator running.

Just my 2 cents.
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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #22 on: March 27, 2017, 10:21:49 AM »
  The UPS uses 4 of the 12 volt @ 9 Amp hour batteries,wired for 24 volts.

If you thought 20 amps charging was too low then you really are in for a surprise as this unit likely has a 2 amp or so charger built in and will be sadly slow when you try to use it alone to charge your battery bank...An auxiliary charger will be needed and I still suggest a Schumacher 3 stage charger.
Also note that an UPS of this size in often not designed for continuous running of long duration though it should run long enough to get the generator running.

Just my 2 cents.

Slow charge is much less of an issue if you don't experience power loss often, or if you're planning on switching to a generator anyway. I agree that you might need a better charger if you experience frequent brownouts over the course of many days, but a quick test will confirm that need. I don't care if it takes two days to charge my battery as long as I had enough power to last my three hour blackout, or until I get my generator online. Though this isn't a high-end UPS, it certainly served well to keep my POE switches running for 10 minutes in the building blackout they survived.
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Offline Carl

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #23 on: March 27, 2017, 11:15:09 AM »
Slow charge is much less of an issue

Hey,I agree...The OP wanted as much as a 40 amp charge rate as 20 amps was thought too low...I prefer C20 for my uses.
I was just trying to point out the change in direction from earlier plans.
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #24 on: March 27, 2017, 07:38:18 PM »
Hey,I agree...The OP wanted as much as a 40 amp charge rate as 20 amps was thought too low...I prefer C20 for my uses.
I was just trying to point out the change in direction from earlier plans.
I decided to change directions :)

How about this http://www.ebay.com/itm/Aker-Wade-Twinmax-5002-Fast-Charger-500-Amps-6-40-Cells-W-Stand-Mint-Condition-/221630457757?hash=item339a34679d:m:m5HKWF7XzbThOAn20Fk9A2A:
My wife would love that in the living room!

Offline Carl

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #25 on: March 28, 2017, 04:18:03 AM »
  That is a nice charger and the new wife will probably say it matches the curtains. ;D
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

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If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #26 on: May 27, 2017, 09:47:10 AM »
Here is what I ended up with:
4 US Battery 6V US 2200 XC2 batteries wired for 12V
Magnum CSW1012 1000W 12VDC Pure Sine Inverter
Blue Sea 6006 M-Series Battery Switch
Sterling ProCharge Ultra Battery Charger 1240 - 40 Amp, currently set to 25% (10amp) charging, temp sensor on battery.
Set up in basement with 2x 50ft 12 ga power cords
4 x 12V accessory splitter


Offline Alan Georges

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #27 on: May 27, 2017, 10:02:26 AM »
Good job, survivalmz.  You got it done.

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2017, 10:04:49 AM »
  Looks like a good setup. Have you done a test run?
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

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If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

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Offline survivalmz

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Re: DIY Medical Device UPS with Battery Bank Backup
« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2017, 11:22:09 AM »
Good job, survivalmz.  You got it done.
Thanks - The power cables i ordered from ebay or amazon with the ends and heat shrink vs buying the materials and a crimper. I havent added up the costs yet, maybe I don't want to...

  Looks like a good setup. Have you done a test run?
Thanks, not yet. I got it finished this week and hooked up the charger. It can run at 100% down to 25% of the 40 amp output. I ran it and now it's in float mode. The inverter is 1000w pure sine wave. I probably and going to add a small Victron 350w as a backup. I'll test soon and document or show the family in case I am not here.