Author Topic: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification  (Read 2165 times)

Offline DheereCrossing

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I asked Jack & Dorothy a question last time I visited Nine Mile Farm that I thought I'd pose to the community here.

Can you follow the principles of Modern Survivalism and Preparedness without accumulating a bunch of 'stuff'?

I've been thinking about this for a long time and have had many internal conflicts around the subject.  We have tried to slim down our lives and gotten rid of many things we at one time thought were very valuable - it all comes down to owning things and things that you perceive hold value, either to yourself or that you think would have value to others if you were to sell/barter said items.

I understand having a bit extra in the pantry to eat in case of emergency, minor as it may be, or some extra this or that for a rainy day.  Getting out of debt, building wealth, etc but I'm questioning the filling every space in your home, outbuildings, storage lockers, closets, etc with 'stuff' all in the name of prepping and survivalism.

I would REALLY like to declutter my life and live sustainably, simply, and with less commitments and stressors in our lives.  So, how do you be prepared, safe, & well, happy, without surrounding yourselves with so much 'stuff'?
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Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2017, 12:22:15 AM »
organize.

Seriously, you can have a streamlined, open and uncluttered  house, and have well organized storage.

to actually be prepared for a plan "B", you have to have stuff and learn new skills. Doesnt mean your home has to look like an episode of hoarders. You cannot be prepared for food self sufficiency without some amount of gear to do some off the list: store and/ of grow and/ or process.

Our foremothers were self sufficient and also minimalists. Pioneers did not have alot of stuff, but still grew, preserved all their food, fixed their tools, built a cabin. SO, another idea is to learn skills to take care of yourself that are simple and do not require alot of stuff.

You can grow a complete, (vegan) balanced diet for one person on 1000 sq ft of yard with nothing but a shovel and some seeds to start out with.  I would add a little space for a couple fruit trees. Have a few good cast irons pots and pans to cook with.

YOu can learn how to build shelter in case something happens to yours that you can do with a good knife and a shovel. Axe might be nice.

To know how to do things simple will require practice and honing a few skills.
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Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2017, 06:24:36 AM »
That is a great question, Dheere!  And a perfect answer, MM.
"Preparedness, when properly pursued, is a way of life, not a sudden, spectacular program" - Spencer W. Kimball
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Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2017, 07:16:45 AM »
Great topic.  I have been contemplating the same thing.  I have too much clutter in my life and it is becoming a real issue as I struggle with new health problems that are neurological and effecting my day to day life.   

How can I make my life more functional while I am losing functionality and still be able to do the things I love like gardening?


Offline Alan Georges

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2017, 04:45:33 PM »
organize.
100% true.  For some of us, it's easier said than done.  Doesn't make it any less true though.

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Offline Carl

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2017, 06:04:07 PM »
Simplify ,PRIORITIZE,then ORGANIZE
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

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Offline Jeremy Downing

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #6 on: April 18, 2017, 05:52:14 AM »
Not being glib, but skills > stuff. All day long.

“When governments fear the people, there is liberty.
When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.
The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.”
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Offline DheereCrossing

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2017, 01:33:19 PM »
I'm getting caught up in the accumulation of stuff/gear/equipment again while starting and building my business venture.  It makes trying to appreciate the minimalist lifestyle frustrating.  It's not the money and value, but the time to get rid of the extra stuff taking up the space that I'm having so much difficulty with at this point in my life.  If someone wanted to back the truck up and help load it all in one evening, I could free up 1/2 the garage and would feel all the better for it - just don't tell me where it's all going to go unless it's for someone else's enjoyment;  I don't want to think of it all filling up a landfill.
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Offline Cedar

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2017, 08:23:22 PM »
. Marking this for later

Cedar
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Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2017, 11:41:49 PM »
"Don't ever let yourself get attached to anything that you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you feel the heat around the corner."
-Neil McCauley, Heat

I have thought that there are many emergencies where previous investment will cause some preppers, especially where significant cultivation or material stockpiles, will make sub-optimal choices due to a desire to not leave those assets.

Who is more prepared in the modern economic environment?  The homesteader light who needs a job but also has a homestead, community they are tied to and don't wish to leave, significant material preps...or the apartment dweller, few possessions, who have few impediments to going where the wind (jobs/opportunity) takes them? That lifestyle is not what I want, but at the same time I have a hard time not seeing it as a functional adaptation to modern economic conditions.
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Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #10 on: June 20, 2017, 12:03:07 AM »
"Don't ever let yourself get attached to anything that you are not willing to walk out on in 30 seconds flat if you feel the heat around the corner."
-Neil McCauley, Heat

I have thought that there are many emergencies where previous investment will cause some preppers, especially where significant cultivation or material stockpiles, will make sub-optimal choices due to a desire to not leave those assets.

Who is more prepared in the modern economic environment?  The homesteader light who needs a job but also has a homestead, community they are tied to and don't wish to leave, significant material preps...or the apartment dweller, few possessions, who have few impediments to going where the wind (jobs/opportunity) takes them? That lifestyle is not what I want, but at the same time I have a hard time not seeing it as a functional adaptation to modern economic conditions.

Except, it seems to me, that it is no longer possible to trust that one can go to a new place and make it. Used to be, when I was in early adulthood, that there was no doubt a person could show up to a new town, a new town in a new state even, and trust that they could find a job and some kind of living accommodations. You could get in your car and drive somewhere new with a small amount of money.

Modern economic conditions seem to be that people are rightfully more scared to give up the situation they have as the risk in the new place could have them end up on the streets.
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Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #11 on: June 20, 2017, 01:59:26 AM »
Except, it seems to me, that it is no longer possible to trust that one can go to a new place and make it. Used to be, when I was in early adulthood, that there was no doubt a person could show up to a new town, a new town in a new state even, and trust that they could find a job and some kind of living accommodations. You could get in your car and drive somewhere new with a small amount of money.

Modern economic conditions seem to be that people are rightfully more scared to give up the situation they have as the risk in the new place could have them end up on the streets.
Isnt the flip side that you cant trust that a single location will be a viable course of action either?  Even a homestead can be made non-viable by any number of issues and calamities, not to mention that many people simply don't want to default to subsistence agriculture.  I personally am sick of moving all the time but that results in trade offs.  Any strategy for building personal resiliency works, until it doesn't.  It sure is a huge risk to rely on mobility solely, but there is also real risk that a prepper will be reluctant to displace till the situation is extremely perilous and the movement could be much riskier. 

I think it could be safely said that homesteading and stationary prepping gets a lot of intellectual space in prepperdom and things like simplicity and mobility probably need a little more.  The good thing is that I think mobility is less resource intensive and more procedural so being ready for both should be possible.
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Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #12 on: June 20, 2017, 06:55:03 AM »
Isnt the flip side that you cant trust that a single location will be a viable course of action either?  Even a homestead can be made non-viable by any number of issues and calamities, not to mention that many people simply don't want to default to subsistence agriculture.  I personally am sick of moving all the time but that results in trade offs.  Any strategy for building personal resiliency works, until it doesn't.  It sure is a huge risk to rely on mobility solely, but there is also real risk that a prepper will be reluctant to displace till the situation is extremely perilous and the movement could be much riskier. 

I think it could be safely said that homesteading and stationary prepping gets a lot of intellectual space in prepperdom and things like simplicity and mobility probably need a little more.  The good thing is that I think mobility is less resource intensive and more procedural so being ready for both should be possible.

I agree that it is often a needed strategy.

It just seems a "scarier" thing to do than in the past, for most people. I see many people in the greater SF bay area that absolutely should go live somewhere else with more opportunities, but the ones with the most to gain by doing so are the least likely to take the plunge. These people and families do not have safety nets and see this as a big risk, and this is likely true. I feel that the bar was lower in the past, that housing was easy enough to get that a low paying job would secure it, and that it was easy to find work that paid enough to live.

As a prep, I agree that we should position ourselves to be able to cut our losses and do so. Some savings. Skill building to have something to offer in new locations. Ability/resiliency to live on very little while finding our way in a new place.
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Offline DheereCrossing

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #13 on: June 20, 2017, 09:31:36 AM »
Does this all come down to routine, comfort, complacency, and fear?  Is accumulating stuff around you wherever you land and for however long drive our very existence?  I would SO much like to live a more mobile lifestyle but you're right in the idea that 'hey, I've got stuff here and I can't just carry it all with me...' and how do I know it will be better for me/us over there?  Do I really NEED to 'settle in' over there or can we survive/thrive by living light and mobile?  I guess that's the call of the RV life - all your stuff in one vehicle going from place to place, but you still have to have the resources to maintain a lifestyle like that.
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Offline Carl

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Re: Modern Survivalist & Preparedness principles vs. Simplification
« Reply #14 on: June 20, 2017, 10:08:03 AM »
Does this all come down to routine, comfort, complacency, and fear?  Is accumulating stuff around you wherever you land and for however long drive our very existence?  I would SO much like to live a more mobile lifestyle but you're right in the idea that 'hey, I've got stuff here and I can't just carry it all with me...' and how do I know it will be better for me/us over there?  Do I really NEED to 'settle in' over there or can we survive/thrive by living light and mobile?  I guess that's the call of the RV life - all your stuff in one vehicle going from place to place, but you still have to have the resources to maintain a lifestyle like that.

Look at what you threat list is :


power outage/services interruption (storms/earth quake
loss of health
Loss of Job
Hazmat spill
riots
terror ...bombs etc
World ending event etc

and now think which of these would require you to leave for a short time
and which would cause you to leave forever

What changes will make where you live 'hardened' and therefor safer to stay than to travel in the 'leave scenarios'

Very few instances will cause a prepared person to risk travel unless required by storm,hazmat /fire events/maybe the end of the world if you have you spaceship running.There are few reasons to leave that don't involve risk. My 'move' would only be a few miles ,though few reasons exist in my imagination that might force me to move. Most of my 'stuff' is at the hardened BOL as is stuff for over 25 members...only minutes away and secure storage with room and equipment to support more than the member list for a long time ...Yet ,I /we will probably never need it beyond it's secure storage capability...I often spend days and nights there to clean,maintain systems ,though many members are skilled enough to maintain the BOL when I am no longer able.Enough about my stuff.

  You might do well to do a temporary evac when in harms way. But gypsies have little chance of survival without provision...Make a plan and find another prepper that is not too far away for the short or long term events ...this way you are going to something and not just running blindly away.

and then you BOTH have a secure place to land in time of need.
Stop complaining about life and start Celebrating it .

I've reached the age where there is little left to learn the hard way.

If you had only one year,one month,or one day...Would you live your life differently?

Radios are pointless without someone trained to use them.