Author Topic: the Las Vegas shooting has convinced me to take medical training...help me decid  (Read 441 times)

Offline XtvvmEb

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The recent Las Vegas shooting has convinced me to finally be serious about taking some medical training for myself and my family.

I want to approach it sensibly (i.e., not jump immediately to a "Combat Medic Level 93" course).

I'm starting from a baseline of zero; I've never had any medical training of any type.

Will you please help me assemble a useful list of training materials and a useful sequence of approach? For example, I assume I should start with something like a Red Cross first aid and CPR class as well as some online videos and then proceed to in-person classes.

Where would you start and what kind of medical curriculum would you assemble for a newbie?

Offline Cedar

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Contact t your lo allfire department and/or community/county class s. I would start with Basic First Aid, CPR classes. Sometimes they are free. I got my EMR classes at the fire hall.

Report back when you take them and I will give you +2 Karma. Thanks for going to take the classes.

Cedar
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Offline RitaRose1945

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I went through CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training about a year ago, and really learned a whole lot.   CPR, first aid, search & rescue, - and I made some good contacts that way too.  That would probably be a good place to look.  The link above has a way to search for classes near you.  Be advised that they're long.  The one I attended was all day Saturday and most of Sunday.

I also took a separate CPR/AED class at my work, which I had to push for because I'm in a healthcare related environment, and they figured it was enough if just the people working with patients knew.  I reminded them that the average age of the people I'm working with is "Methuselah" so it might help if the lowly secretaries could resuscitate them when they started dropping like flies.  ;)


Offline Jack Crabb

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For a Las Vegas-type incident, look for a course on TCCC or TECC (Tactical Combat/Emergency Casualty Care). This is pared down to what is essential for that situation. No treatment of bee stings, heat rash, etc.

I have taken two courses. One was 3 hours taught to TCCC standards by a ER doc. The second was a day long course by an SF medic. In the longer course, we practiced more ways to move people, and there were training aids that had arterial bleeding and the "blood" would coagulate with the hemostatic agents. But the shorter course was enough to learn the necessary skills.

Basically, extremity wounds with less bleeding, go with a pressure dressing. Lots of bleeding, put a tourniquet at the shoulder or hip of the affected extremity. Upper chest, put a chest seal.

The point here is not to restore people to health but to preserve them in the best condition possible for the follow on care.

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Offline Chemsoldier

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Good on you for taking the step.  After you have done basic first aid and CPR (seriously, do it first, you will likely witness a road accident in your lifetime, you will probably never be present for a shooting), as suggested the TCCC/TECC style class is an awesome step up.

Dark Angel Medical's Direct Action Response Training was excellent, if spendy. It is the only one I can speak to personally.
http://darkangelmedical.com/our-training/

Also, Active Killer Defense runs a one day course that hits the basics of combatives against armed opponents, how to make a gun stop running at close quarters and basic medical response.  Yes it is rudimentary as hell, but the point is to give people mental options to choose from in the crisis rather than making something up in the lurch.
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Offline Fyrediver

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Good on you for stepping up!

Start with the basics like Red Cross First aid and Community CPR and Defibrillator then build from there.  Often there are courses available through community centers, parks and rec, or fire departments. 

I suggest avoiding EMT training as it's geared toward being in an EMS system with all that entails.  Unless you work for an Agency you probably won't be able to readily keep your cert as you need a sponsor (at least in WA).  Not bad eventually but shouldn't be your first choice. 

I strongly encourage people to take Wilderness First Aid courses as they focus on you being unsupported.   

One course I've heard good things about is the NOLS Wilderness First Aid:  https://www.nols.edu/en/coursefinder/courses/wilderness-first-aid-WFA/


Offline The Professor

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The recent Las Vegas shooting has convinced me to finally be serious about taking some medical training for myself and my family.

I want to approach it sensibly (i.e., not jump immediately to a "Combat Medic Level 93" course).

I'm starting from a baseline of zero; I've never had any medical training of any type.

Will you please help me assemble a useful list of training materials and a useful sequence of approach? For example, I assume I should start with something like a Red Cross first aid and CPR class as well as some online videos and then proceed to in-person classes.

Where would you start and what kind of medical curriculum would you assemble for a newbie?

You don't give us much to go on, as to your personal situation or what you eventually want to be able to accomplish.

Let me make a few suggestions:

1.  If you have a university or tech school near you, consider taking a Paramedic Course.  Though it takes a while longer than most of what I'm going to suggest, it's a very well-rounded curriculum.  Plus, it means you may well be able to find a job, or volunteer for one, that gives you hands-on experience.

2.  In all honesty, basic courses taught by the Red Cross are next to useless for a Tactical Medicine situation. I may be wrong, but I know of no RC courses that teach how to respond to gunshot wounds or other severe trauma incidents.

3.  A good, basic course would be to find a Wilderness First Responder or Wilderness EMT.  These are a bit more realistic in that they teach you how to deal with even basic trauma incidents a long way from help..

4.  Find a shooting school that teaches Tactical First Aid or TC3 (Tactical Combat Casualty Care).  These courses can be a day long or up to a week long, for the ones who teach you how to shoot, as well.  Gunsite Academy, for example, teaches a Tactical Medicine course that is taught by an Emergency Medical Doctor and a military medic.  It is EXCELLENT and I'd put the training up against anyone's.  It's not cheap, though.  You get what you pay for.

5.   Hit your local gunshop up, there may be a local school that teaches Tactical Medicine classes.

Just some thoughts, hope they help.

The Professor
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Offline DDJ

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I agree with the Professor (no surprise there) more than not.  The paramedic class is very equipment centric and if you are not driving an ambulance you would, in my opinion, be wasting a lot of time and training dollars.  I was an EMT 25 years ago and have a good friend who is in paramedic training now.  She is learning to put in IVs and give Meds.  Great skills on a squad but overkill training wise on the street.

The Red Cross classes are CPR and keep more harm from happening to the person or others while you help to keep them alive until the Ambulance arrives.  However the additional training I had recently assumed that we had that training and were keeping it current.  On the surface they do not help in a Vegas type situation buy they may be required for further classes.

I took a Trauma first aid class at a local firearms training center (Weyer Tactical, Alliance Ohio).  I would not even compare to Gunsite or any big house, but it was local and taught by a Ohio SWAP cop.  We used lessons learned from the Boston Marathon Bombing as points of reference.