Author Topic: Russian War  (Read 2399 times)

Offline Fearkat

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Russian War
« on: March 23, 2018, 05:12:39 PM »
I grew up in suburbia on the East Coast of the US, but my business has taken me overseas to several Eastern European countries to the point where I live here 11.5/12 months of the year. Back in the states, I had quite the prep going on. I had not only the equipment to handle a lot of situations but I worked closely with state law enforcement for training and spent a lot of money on professional courses (mostly in the medicine and communications field). These days, I bounce between rental apartments in Bucharest, Tbilisi, Kiev, and Budapest every few months. Unfortunately, when I left the US, I had to pack light and brought only what I considered to be essential prep items. I am looking at purchasing apartments here in Bucharest and Tbilisi, and I am thinking I will visit the US later this year to box up what I left behind and ship it 50/50 split between the two apartments.

Realistically I think my concerns for a Russian invasion are warranted considering at times I live like 40 miles from the current "Russian" border in Georgia, thanks to the 2008 war. Obviously Romania and Hungary are safe considering Russia isn't going to invade a NATO country anytime soon, however, I fear what I could realistically do in the event of another invasion. If I am in Tbilisi and something kicks off, the fact of the matter is that I am in a country whose language I cannot speak, with no vehicle, and the major cities are just military targets. Same thing with Ukraine, although I feel like Kiev is far enough from the current Russian invasion border that I could get out easier and faster than in Tbilisi.

I am curious what you guys would do if you were in a situation like mine. If something did break out, what do you reckon the best course of action is? Should I try to hike it South towards Azerbaijan or Armenia? Take my chances and hope that the US embassy can get me out?   Stay put and try to stay alive in a possible war zone?

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2018, 06:05:39 PM »
Welcome to the forum, Fearkat!

That's a somewhat different prepping situation than most of us are in.  I'll have to give it some thought.  Thanks for starting an interesting topic!

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #2 on: March 23, 2018, 06:21:41 PM »
Can't say I have any actual experience that would be helpful to you... I can remember the time when the wall was still in place in Germany when my husband flew border patrol between east and west. Our plan was for me to go to his relatives (who lived far from the border). He would be occupied with the business of the military, so I would be on my own. I also worked very hard to learn to speak German such that I could probably pass for a German (for a short while, anyway, and assuming I didn't say too much!). If any sort of catastrophe had occurred before my fluency was attained, I would have had a hard time, probably. As it happened, I never had to flee...

I'm hopeful that you'll find ways to prepare yourself after you have been there a little longer... that transitional period when you are still a newcomer is always the most difficult, isn't it?

Offline Cedar

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2018, 06:33:20 PM »
I was watching the events in Ukraine( starting with EuroMaidan, then Donbass, Donetsk Oblast, Sebastopol, etc) happening for hours a day via Livestreams (100s of them), reading papers I had to translate for months from Ukrainian to English , and I was actually picking up the language without trying.

Being that you are there, I certainly would pick up a working knowledge of the language, whichever one you choose from there, even if you merely understand it and not actually speak it.

When I was in Canada, I could not speak or pronounce French, but I could sightread enough to get me by in the shopping sections. You will have to read road signs and other things to travel by in Cyrillic script. Which is very different than our own, but can start to be easily identified by looking at it, even if you cannot pronounce it.

Get some translation books.

Do register with the USA embassy there if you are not already. Fontbwant until an actual problem happens.  Like even if you got some gastric bug and needed to get home to the USA for treatment, it helps.

Got a bike? Know where to procure one in case of emergency? Havevan quick GO bag which won't attract attention? Got local currency hanging around for emergencies?

GOOD Maps? They have topo msps over there? I'd pick 3 places to BO to, in case something is impeding your way.

I'd study up on how the heck.people are living in Donesk with all that bombing going in. They are amazing. Befriend someone with a basement?

Are younsolo.thete or need to take care of people as well?

Find alternative means of communication to friends/family in the states. Even if it is a 'coded' postcard. Having a friend places email or phone call as you BO.

Have grey man, weather appropriate clothing. Don't act like a typical American. Trust me, non-Americans can pick.us out like a neon sign most of the time.

It will be a pain having stuff between the 2 apartments. Either pack the gear between the two places, or have doubles.

Cedar

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2018, 06:56:22 PM »
First off, welcome.  That's a VERY interesting situation that you have put yourself into.  I don't envy you.  ;)

Second, any time Cedar replies, listen to her.  I'm always amazed at what she knows, has done or has at least thought about.

As for my input, I can't say I've ever been in any situation anywhere close.  But now's the time to prep.  Learn the language.  It's going to take time and you are in the perfect situation to learn it fast, total immersion.  You can't expect to easily survive if you can't even speak the language.  Personally, I'd lean it on the down low.  That way the locals don't know you are learning it and have no idea that when they are speaking that you can understand.  Kind of gives you the upper hand.

Next I'd get used to doing like the locals.  You can likely blend in visually.  Don't make yourself stand out and become friends with your neighbors.  You don't want your neighbors pointing you out to the invading forces as that American scum.  Less likely if you are their buddy or if you don't stick out as a foreigner.

I thought I'd have more, but not really at this point.  I'll think about it.


But I'll end with when you get the chance, please stop over at the Intro Thread and introduce yourself.  You'll get a lot more support if people know a little about you and your situation.

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2018, 07:57:45 PM »
For a price you could have an international medical extraction and repatriation company come flying to the rescue. 

This company says they’ll extract members from a war zone:  https://www.globalrescue.com. But I have no idea how affordable a service like that is.


Even without the threat of war, medical emergencies in vast swaths of the world are best dealt with by getting home.  A friend’s mother died last year after complications from a mismanaged heart attack while cruising the Caribbean. The island hospital held her hostage for $30k cash before they could fly her to Houston, and on top of it gave her an inappropriate treatment that necessitated amputation of both legs once back to the US, only to die a couple months later from further complications.

Offline Knecht

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2018, 07:18:03 AM »
Hey man, looks like I may be your closest neighbor from this forum, living in Czech Republic. Not really close enough to actually help you where you are, but in case you were running to the west, I'm here to help.
As for Russia not daring to invade a NATO country, I wouldn't rely on that. NATO will gladly sacrifice eastern countries anytime.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2018, 09:37:46 AM »

Being that you are there, I certainly would pick up a working knowledge of the language, whichever one you choose from there, even if you merely understand it and not actually speak it.

Get some translation books.

GOOD Maps? They have topo msps over there? I'd pick 3 places to BO to, in case something is impeding your way.

Have grey man, weather appropriate clothing. Don't act like a typical American. Trust me, non-Americans can pick.us out like a neon sign most of the time.

Cedar

^^^ This, especially... I really agree about trying to learn to dress/behave like the locals. There may be times when it is good to be easily identified as an American... this wouldn't be one of them.

I remember enjoying the fact that I could blend in and people would speak German to me, not realizing I wasn't also German... and aside from the value in being able to survive a bad situation, it really makes the experience in the country so much more pleasant if you learn about the culture, can understand the jokes, etc.

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2018, 08:41:31 PM »
     I would also, in additions to all of the good suggestions here, read up on historical instances of how Americans or the British were able to survive in places that were occupied by the Germans and the Japanese during WWII. I should probably take my own advice, as I hadn't really thought about it until now. I imagine there were some "round ups" and imprisonment in internment camps of non-military "Westerners". Of course you would want to avoid all of that. Getting to the nearest embassy (U.S. or non-combatant, neutral country) might help. If you can travel out of the war zone to a safer region, that might work, but to be discovered as an American could lead to detention as a spy. If you were grabbed off of the streets, especially with any kind of "survival" gear, you might expect to just disappear into some detention and interrogation "basement", never to return. Make sure that our embassy knows that you are a citizen in that country and where you live. I'd ask at the consulate what you should do if hostilities should break out; there must be some kind of protocol. Going it alone, on the street could be very risky. If you think that you would be better off "bugging in", I'd stock up on the favorite brand of cigarettes, a decent local booze (in small bottles), and any of the other trade goods, along with some local currency, to "grease a few palms". it could buy your safety or freedom. And definitely learn a few phrases. I was recently in St. Petersburg and I had learned a few Russian greetings and the "please and thank you". I was amazed at how it warmed up the locals. Good luck.   

Offline Fixit

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Re: Russian War
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2018, 07:53:40 AM »
Taking a little different tack. I question shipping gear from the U.S. .Would you not be better buying local so that it blends in and has local parts available? Granted you already have money tied up in preps here but what will overseas shipping cost . Then let's say you make it back to the U.S. and we are involved in a war over there you might very well wish that that stuff was back statewide.