Author Topic: UK Gun Law  (Read 6356 times)

Offline stevebluff

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UK Gun Law
« on: September 23, 2008, 07:31:37 AM »
Hi, since the Hungerford shootings (  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hungerford_Massacre ) in the UK, semi auto's have been ALMOST totally banned.  I need to give you an overview of UK gun law.  Sorry but this isn't a short answer. Also, interpretation of Uk law appears to reside which each police force chief constable, so you get differing rules across the country,

one quick answer, an AR 15 is legal if you have to cock it each time or (you can get one) have an under lever type mechanism.


Section 2: Shotguns can have a magazine of two rounds (2+1, tie one in the chamber).  There is also a barrel length minimum. As long as you stay with these rules it is a shotgun not a firearm.  A shotgun license is still a right.

Air rifles (below 12 ft/lbs) are relatively restriction free for adults.

Air soft (replica plastic BB guns) now have a registration scheme.

Section 1:
Fire arms.  Usually a fire arms certificate (FAC) refers to section 1 firearms (more on that in a moment), there is no right to own a fire arm it is a privilege (i listen in awe to your 2nd amendment discussions!!).  You have to show good reason/cause.  Self defence is not good reason.  Member ship of a shooting club usually is, how ever some police forces are wanting to see club records to show you are actively using any guns on your FAC (ticket).  500 rounds to buy and 750 rounds to hold (at any one time) is about what most people are allowed unless there are exceptional circumstances (i know of one chap who fought to be allowed 20,000 .22 LR). Automatic (self loading) firearms are forbidden (automatics were previously never allowed - not in my life time!).  Marlin type guns are OK, .22 LR is allowed as a self loading/automatic.  Bolt action rifles have come back into use for practical rifle competitions (10 round box mag).  Pistols are not available, apart from a) black powder, b) antiques (complicated and with draconian restrictions).  Long barrelled revolvers (pistols with long barrels and an arm brace/counterbalance) are currently allowed although there are moves to ban them.  Some pistols have been granted for humane dispatch of wounded dear but this is an up hill struggle.  If you want to change or get an firearm you basically have to re-apply  for a new license.  If you want to add a new shooting area, you need to get it on your FAC.  Large calibre rifles (.50 etc) are under pressure. Government discussion papers talk about there being no recognised sporting competition for these guns so they should be also banned.

Section 5:
Anything not in another category is under section 5. Technically nothing is banned, but section 5 licenses are few are far between.

Bow/cross bow hunting is illegal.

Some funnies. I have a Brockock air pistol

"The government has announced that from January 20th 2004, it will become illegal to purchase, acquire, manufacture, sell or transfer any weapon that uses a Self Contained Gas Cartridge (SCGC) system. (i.e. Brocock, Uberti, Pietta, Saxby&Palmer and Crown)."

When handguns were banned, C02 guns, (which were previously classed as firearms) were taken off "ticket"

''''''''''''''

From: http://www.classicguncompany.co.uk/legal.htm

 THE SITUATION IN THE U.K.

There are EU Directives in place which deal with the possession and use of “weapons”: however, some Countries reserve the right to impose additional or different Laws / Regulations. Eventually it is to be hoped that there will be “harmonisation” within the EU but it would be unrealistic to hope that UK domestic legislation would change significantly: even within the UK there are significant differences, especially with regard to Pistols and Revolvers – and now the Scottish Nationalists are pressing for the ability to pass their own Firearms Legislation, whilst in Eire people are now getting back the right to firearms prohibited during “the troubles”.

Strictly speaking all firearms are licensable in the U.K. but certain parts of the Kingdom (Northern Ireland, Isle of Man, Channel Islands) have their own domestic legislation, e.g., in Northern Ireland differs in that all “bullet firing weapons” (including low power airguns) require certification and cartridge pistols/revolvers are NOT Prohibited Weapons.

Many types of Antique Firearms may be held without a Certificate under Section 58(2) of the current Firearms Acts – i.e., if they are held solely as “Curios or Ornaments”. (more on this later!)

In the U.K. the basic classifications of firearms under the current legislation are:-

“Section 1” – requiring a Firearm Certificate: rifles, short-barrel or large capacity shotguns or modern (post 1939) muzzle-loading pistols and revolvers;

“Section 2” – requiring a Shotgun certificate: shotguns with barrels over 24” or holding no m ore than 3 cartridges;

“Section 5” – Prohibited Weapons: these require either specific authority from the Home Secretary (for a Registered Firearms Dealer) or a specially conditioned F.A.C. (e.g., for a Humane Killer, Tranquilliser Gun for Vets or for “Heritage Pistols).
There are a number of classes of “Section 5”, the more frequently encountered being
s.5(1)(a) (fully automatic arms),
s.5(1)(b) (Centrefire S-L and Pump-action rifles),
s.5(1)(aba) (“short firearms” --- Eurospeak for pistols and revolvers, with a barrel length of less than 300mm and overall less than 600mm),
s.5(1)(ac) “short shotguns” and s.5(1)(aa) “firearms disguised as other objects” – normally encountered as Walking-Stick Shotguns.
s.5(1)(c) refers to “expanding ammunition” which requires specific authority on the FAC and may NOT be used for target-shooting (--- i.e., it is o.k. to go into the hill and tack a playing card to a tree to zero your stalking rifle but NOT to take it to a proper certificated range!)

“SECTION 58(2)” – text copied from Chapter 8 of the Home Office Manual of Guidance:

“Section 58(2) of the 1968 Act exempts from the provisions of the Act – including certificate controls under sections 1 and 2 and prohibition under section 5 – all antique firearms which are sold, transferred, purchased, acquired or possessed as curiosities or ornaments.”

The term “Antique firearm” is, as yet, undefined in law but the Guidance makes it clear that IF the item is “used” then the exemption cannot be claimed and the firearm MUST be certificated.
There is a rebuttal presumption that ammunition should not be held, which creates a problem for the collector of both Firearms AND Ammunition. The Home Office provides a list of “obsolete chamberings” (Appendix 5 of the “Guidance”) to assist the Collector and the Police.
Although the letter of the law does not prohibit the possession of the component of ammunition for s.58(2) firearms, or equipment to assemble such ammunition, such possession puts at risk the whole concept.

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Offline Patriot:Ex Machina

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Re: UK Gun Law
« Reply #1 on: September 23, 2008, 07:51:29 AM »
Thanks for posting this thread. Maybe as the forum grows, we can turn this into an "International Gun Law" thread, sort of a resource for folks  who might not understand gun laws in various places.

POST EDITED FOR SPELLING.

Offline stevebluff

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Re: UK Gun Law
« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2008, 08:36:05 AM »
I think it would be good for all of our community to know what they can do in each jurisdiction.   Be it in a particular state of the US or internationally.

In the UK for multi shot "repeating" capability in a firearm you can go for a long barrelled revolver, a marlin type under lever, or a magazine fed .22LR.  The only other option, apart from box magazine bolt action rifles is from southern gun company.  They produce a .30 lever action AR15, see photo.

http://www.southern-gun.co.uk/?page=items&cat_id=1

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Offline Patriot:Ex Machina

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Re: UK Gun Law
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2008, 08:45:46 AM »
I think it would be good for all of our community to know what they can do in each jurisdiction.   Be it in a particular state of the US or internationally.

In the UK for multi shot "repeating" capability in a firearm you can go for a long barrelled revolver, a marlin type under lever, or a magazine fed .22LR.  The only other option, apart from box magazine bolt action rifles is from southern gun company.  They produce a .30 lever action AR15, see photo.

http://www.southern-gun.co.uk/?page=items&cat_id=1

That's a cool link!  :)

Offline ModernSurvival

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Re: UK Gun Law
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2008, 10:28:32 AM »
That is kind of cool and even where you can own semis it would be a great training gun because it would control the rate of fire for a new shooter.

Offline stevebluff

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Re: UK Gun Law
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2008, 12:14:18 AM »
Iti is quite a piece isbn't ti!

I am seriously considering it, but would appreciate some feed back on the use of .30 as it is not a round I am personally very familiar with. 5.56 and 7.62 are what i usually use.  I have recently been shooting .303 as i have been considering a .303 lee Enfield SMLE box fed magazine rifle.

Offline stevebluff

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Re: UK Gun Law
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2008, 12:48:43 AM »
http://www.riflesintheuk.com/ar15.htm

Very interesting and well put together site. I has a section on UK AR 15's "the black rifle".  In the gallery section there are pictures of some of the sites contributors fire arms including 2 x AR15's.


Quotes from site:

This is darrel's .223 AR15. It features a Cactus Arms upper with left side cocking handle and a Spike Tactical lower. It has a Magpul trigger guard and PRS stock. The machined alloy forend is from Yankee Hill along as is the bipod mount. The 18" barrel is a stainless fluted match barrel from Wilson and the rifle has an Arnold Jewel match trigger. The scope is a Falcon Merlin 10x42 tactical with skeleton mildot reticule. The rifle has 20 and 10 round DPMS mag's but uses a bob sled for single loading as it likes long, heavy rounds at an OAL of 2.31".

This is my new toy. It was made by Mark Bradley, a keen and successful British AR15 shooter who also makes top quality AR15s. It features a Sabre Defense lower and the upper sports a 1-in-8 twist stainless 20" barrel from Border Barrels fitted with a flash hider. The forend is a DCM float tube and the stock is a basic M16 style stock which together give a cool retro M16 look. The trigger is a single stage trigger from Accuracy Speaks. I haven't shot it yet but am going to use Lapua brass with 69 grain Scenars. I have fitted a bipod stud adaptor to the float tube so I can use it with my Harris bipod. The photo shows a 30-round magazine but I have since replaced it with a genuine Colt 20 round magazine so that it doesn't rest on the magazine when I shoot it prone.

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